bw-home-icon[1] Cultural Facilities Corporation home u Annual Report 2017-18 home

B. ORGANISATION OVERVEW AND PERFORMANCE

B.1 ORGANISATIONAL OVERVIEW

B.2 PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS

B.3 SCRUTINY

B.4 RISK MANAGEMENT

B.5 INTERNAL AUDIT

B.6 FRAUD PREVENTION  

B.7 WORK HEALTH AND SAFETY

B.8 HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT

B.9 ECOLOGICALLY SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT


B.1 Organisational Overview

B.1.1 Vision, mission and values 

The CFC’s 2016–21 Strategic Plan provides the overarching framework for the organisation’s planning activities over a five-year period, including for the development of its annual corporate plans. 

The Strategic Plan identifies the CFC’s role, vision, key values and principles, and key priorities.  It also identifies the mission, purpose, vision and key strategies both for the organisation as a whole and for its three program delivery divisions :

>        the Canberra Theatre Centre;

>        the Canberra Museum and Gallery (CMAG), including the Nolan Collection Gallery @ CMAG; and

>        the ACT Historic Places : Lanyon, Calthorpes’ House and Mugga-Mugga.  

Vision

Our vision is for Canberra to be a creative capital that values the arts for their intrinsic qualities, their contribution to building a more inclusive and resilient society, their support for making the city an exciting place to live and an attractive destination for business and tourism, and their important role in the economy of the ACT and region.

We see the CFC as a leader in this creative city, providing high quality cultural experiences based on the arts and heritage resources that we hold in trust for the people of Canberra, and playing a significant role in the region’s cultural and economic life.

Mission

The mission/purpose statements identified in the Strategic Plan are supported by statements as to what the CFC is seeking to achieve in a number of areas, as set out below.

CFC

What we are

An enterprise of the ACT Government that manages a number of Canberra’s major cultural facilities

What we do

We connect people with rich and diverse cultural experiences through activities at our venues

Our vision

To provide cultural leadership in the Canberra region and beyond

What we want to achieve

Leadership : A cultural leader in the ACT region and beyond

Strategy : A clear direction for our future

Governance  : An accountable and dynamic organisation

People : An employer of choice

Finances : Long-term financial sustainability

Assets : Support for delivering high quality cultural experiences

 

Canberra Theatre Centre

What we are

The Canberra region’s main theatre centre, incorporating the Canberra Theatre, The Playhouse and the Courtyard Studio

What we do

We connect people with theatre experiences of national and international quality

Our vision

To be a leading theatre centre in Australasia and Asia

What we want to achieve

Customers : Audiences that are growing, diverse, engaged and entertained

Programming : A diverse, high quality, entertaining and distinctive program

Business : Venues, systems and people that support high quality live performance

Leadership : An integral part of the cultural life of the Canberra region and beyond

 

CMAG

What we are

A museum and gallery dedicated to the visual arts and social history of the Canberra region

What we do

We connect people with the Canberra region’s rich and diverse stories, sense of place, and contemporary identity

Our vision

To be a leading regional cultural venue in Australia and beyond

What we want to achieve

Customers  : Audiences that are growing, diverse, engaged and entertained

Programming : Exhibitions and programs that reflect Canberra’s unique identity

Stewardship : Venues and collections that allow us to tell the many stories of Canberra

Leadership : An integral part of the cultural life of the Canberra region and beyond

 

ACT Historic Places

What we are

Three historic places that reflect different aspects of Canberra’s history : Lanyon, Calthorpes’ House and Mugga-Mugga

What we do

We connect people with Canberra’s rich and diverse stories and heritage

Our vision

To be leading historic places in Australia and beyond

What we want to achieve

Customers : Audiences that are growing, diverse, engaged and entertained

Programming : Programs that explore Canberra’s history by interpreting each place

Stewardship : Buildings, grounds and collections that are conserved and researched

Leadership : An integral part of the cultural life of the Canberra region and beyond

Key Values and Principles

Leadership

>          We are committed to providing cultural leadership, excellence and innovation, including leadership in using digital applications to enhance our systems and programs.

Engagement

>          We actively seek to engage our communities in a greater understanding of the value of the arts, and of our cultural heritage, through our programs and activities, placing customer service as our primary goal and recognising the diverse needs and expectations of our customers.

Collaboration

>          We value cooperative and strategic partnerships across all areas of our activities.

Professionalism

>          We place major importance on maintaining professional standards in the management of our facilities and in the design and delivery of our programs.

In observing these values, we are committed to implementing the :

>          ACT Government Service Values : respect, integrity, collaboration and innovation;

>          Principles of the 2015 ACT Arts Policy : participation and access to the arts; great arts and great artists; vitality of the Canberra region arts ecology; and engagement with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander arts and cultures; and

 

>          ACT Government’s Strategic Priorities.

B.1.2   Role, functions and services

The CFC was established under the Cultural Facilities Corporation Act 1997 (the CFC Act), which came into operation as from 1 November 1997.

The functions of the CFC, as set out in the CFC Act (Section 6) are :

>        to manage, develop, present, coordinate and promote cultural activities at designated locations and other places in the ACT;

>        to establish and research collections;

>        to conserve and exhibit collections in the possession or under the control of the CFC;

>        to undertake activities, in cooperation with other people if appropriate, to exercise its other functions; and

>        to exercise other functions given to the CFC under this Act or another Territory Law.

The CFC Act (Section 7) requires that the CFC, in exercising its functions, must consider :

>        any cultural policies or priorities of the Executive known to the CFC; and

>        other cultural activities in the ACT.

The CFC is responsible for :

>        the Canberra Theatre Centre;

>        CMAG;

>        the Nolan Collection Gallery @ CMAG; and

>        the ACT Historic Places : Lanyon, Calthorpes’ House and Mugga-Mugga.

The CFC’s functions therefore include the performing arts, the visual arts, social history and cultural heritage management.  The organisation delivers a range of cultural services to the community by providing activities such as theatre presentations, exhibitions, and education and community programs, and through conserving and presenting significant aspects of the ACT’s cultural heritage.

Additional information about the CFC can be found at the following websites :

>        www.culturalfacilities.act.gov.au covering whole of CFC matters;

>        www.canberratheatrecentre.com.au covering the Canberra Theatre Centre;

>        www.cmag.com.au covering CMAG and the Nolan Collection Gallery @ CMAG; and

>        www.historicplaces.com.au covering the ACT Historic Places.

Clients and stakeholders

The CFC reports to the Minister for the Arts and Cultural Events.  The Chief Minister, Treasury and Economic Development Directorate (CMTEDD) is the “parent” directorate for the CFC.  The CFC’s other clients and stakeholders include :

>        the community of the ACT and region;

>        visitors to the ACT;

>        the arts, cultural, heritage, education, business and tourism sectors, including other cultural organisations;

>        national producers of performing arts, including commercial and funded companies;

>        the diplomatic community; and

>        the media, especially the Canberra media.

B.1.3   Organisational structure, environment and planning framework

Organisational structure

The CFC is organised into three program delivery divisions: the Canberra Theatre Centre, CMAG, and the ACT Historic Places, together with a central finance/corporate section.  The CFC’s top level organisational chart as of 30 June 2018 is provided below.

Figure B.1.3a CFC Organisational Chart

Organisational environment

During 2017–18, the CFC had close working relationships with a number of ACT Government agencies including Enterprise Canberra, Transport Canberra and City Services Directorate, Environment, Planning and Sustainable Development Directorate, ACT Heritage Council, Libraries ACT, Office of the Coordinator-General, Education Directorate, Shared Services, ACT Property Group, Territory Records Office, Theo Notaras Multicultural Centre, Treasury and ACT Audit Office.

Planning Framework

As noted in Section B.1.1, the CFC has adopted a five-year Strategic Plan that provides the overarching framework for the organisation’s planning activities, including for the development of its annual corporate plans. 

The CFC’s 2017-18 Corporate Plan, based on its 2016-21 Strategic Plan, identified the actions the CFC intended to take during the year to work towards the Strategic Plan.  Results relating to these actions are reported in summary in this section and in detail in Section B.2.

The CFC’s accountability indicators and targets for 2017–18 were identified in the CFC’s 2017-18 Statement of Intent, which was included in the 2017–18 ACT Budget papers.  The Statement of Intent also identified the CFC’s strategic objectives and indicators.  Results relating to the CFC’s accountability and strategic indicators are reported in summary in this section and in detail in the 2017–18 Statement of Performance at Attachment 1 to this report.

B.1.4   Summary of performance in achieving objectives and targets

Performance outcomes – Accountability Indicators

2017–18 was an active and successful year for the CFC, in which the organisation achieved good results against all but one of its accountability indicators.  For example, during the year the CFC :

>       welcomed an estimated 405,690 visitors and patrons to its facilities and programs, a figure 6% above target and mainly relating to higher than expected visitors to the Canberra Theatre Centre, and to ACT Historic Places; 

>       provided 596 education and community programs, a figure 15% above target and relating particularly to the provision of programs at the ACT Historic Places; and

>       achieved a higher than expected number of days of venue usage at the Canberra Theatre Centre with a total of 691 days of usage, 14% above target.

The CFC did not achieve its 2017–18 target for the number of exhibitions held at its facilities, with a result slightly below target (a result of 19, or 5% below the target of 20).  It should be noted that the CMAG exhibition Peace, Love and World War : The Denmans, Empire and Australia 1910–1917 toured to King’s College, London during the year but was not included in the exhibition numbers as it was not held at a facility managed by the CFC.

Detailed performance results and variance explanations are included in the 2017–18 Statement of Performance at Attachment 1 to this report.  

Performance outcomes – Financial Management

The CFC’s overall financial result for 2017–18 was an operating deficit of $2.357m, which was 12% better than the budgeted deficit of $2.686m.  This result was mainly due to lower that budgeted depreciation expenses.  It should be noted that, due to its large asset holdings and consequent significant depreciation expenses, the CFC always expects to have an operating deficit, since it is not funded for depreciation but receives capital injections through the capital works program.  The operating deficit for 2017–18 was slightly lower than depreciation expenses for the year, meaning that the CFC achieved a small cash surplus.

The CFC achieved an own-sourced revenue figure of 53.6% as a proportion of total revenue for  2017–18, against a target of 45.9%.  The better than target result relates mainly to increased revenue from the higher than expected volume of theatre business at the Canberra Theatre Centre.  The CFC achieved a Cost to Government per estimated visitor/patron of $21.48 against a target of $22.87, the better than target result reflecting the above-target number of visitors and patrons.

The CFC also completed all its 2017–18 capital works and capital upgrade projects by year-end, and acquitted 100% of its capital works funding for the year. 

A full analysis of the CFC’s financial results and financial position is set out in the Management Discussion and Analysis at Attachment 1 to this report.

Performance outcomes – Strategic Objectives/Indicators

Strategic Objective 1 – The CFC provides cultural leadership in the Canberra region and beyond.

Strategic Indicator 1 : The extent to which the CFC connects people with rich and diverse cultural experiences through activities at its venues, in the following areas.

>        Leadership : A cultural leader in the ACT region and beyond

·         Throughout the year the CFC pursued its goal of providing leadership in cultural planning, administration and management. 

·         In November 2017, the CFC’s 20th anniversary was the focus for activities that celebrated the organisation’s achievements and leadership role and looked to future directions. 

·         Through a partnership with arts advocacy body The Childers Group, the CFC presented an Arts Value Forum in July 2017 that included a number of prominent speakers and was attended by over 100 members of the regional arts community. 

·         During the year, the CFC engaged actively with the new City Renewal Authority on a range of initiatives, both to activate the Civic Square cultural precinct in the short term, such as the Enlighten in the City event, and to put in place longer term cultural planning, especially through a new Civic Arts and Cultural Precinct Plan. 

·         The CFC worked closely with the project team for the Constitution Place development, to reduce the impacts of the construction phase of this project on the CFC’s city-based facilities.  One example of this was the provision of theatre schedules in advance to the project team, to facilitate the planning of excavation work around performance times. 

·         Throughout the year, the CFC engaged in a number of significant partnerships, including with the National Multicultural Festival in presenting the Festival’s Children’s Sanctuary at CMAG, and with the ACT Office for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Affairs in support of Reconciliation Day.

>        Strategy : A clear direction for the future

·        The CFC’s five-year Strategic Plan, covering the period 2016-21, continued to provide the framework for the CFC’s operations. 

·        During the year, the CFC’s 2017–18 Corporate Plan, based on the Strategic Plan, was used to guide the work of the Board, advisory committees, staff and volunteers, with staff performance agreements linked back to the Corporate Plan.  The Corporate Plan for 2018–19 was approved by the Board in June 2018.  The plan was informed by the outcomes of consultative workshops held for staff and advisory committees. 

·        The CFC’s web portal continued to be a key source of up-to-date information about the organisation and during the year was updated to meet the requirements of the Freedom of Information Act 2016.

>        Governance : An accountable and dynamic organisation

·        During 2017–18, the CFC maintained robust governance systems in order to ensure a high standard of accountability. 

·        The Board and the Audit Committee of the Board each met on six occasions, and the CFC embarked on a renewal program to address current board vacancies, including through a board skills audit. 

·        The CFC’s Governance Charter was reviewed and updated to introduce improvements in the operation of the Audit Committee. 

·        The CFC was included in a series of performance audits by the ACT Auditor General, covering public art, performance indicators, and physical security. 

·        Representatives of the ACT Audit Office were invited to all, and attended most, meetings of the Audit Committee during 2017–18. 

·        The CFC’s Strategic Risk Management Plan and Fraud Control Plan were reviewed and updated by the Audit Committee and approved by the CFC Board.  These plans provided the basis for the CFC’s internal audit/quality assurance program during the year. 

·        A major focus for the year was on undertaking updated security risk assessments of each of the CFC’s venues, as the first stage of consolidating the organisation’s security arrangements into comprehensive new security plans and procedures.

>        People : An emploer of choice

·        The CFC continued to focus on attracting, developing and retaining highly skilled staff and volunteers, and on ensuring its sites are safe and rewarding places to work. 

·        CFC staff and volunteers participated in a wide range of training, professional development opportunities and networking programs during the year.  

·        Staff members sat on the boards of a number of cultural organisations and participated in many professional activities, such as opening exhibitions, delivering lectures, attending national and international conferences, and sitting on judging panels. 

·        Through the 2017 Don Aitkin Awards, the outstanding efforts of CFC staff and volunteers were recognised and celebrated. 

·        Work health safety continued to be a priority, including through Wellbeing in the Workplace initiatives; regular meetings of the CFC’s Work Health and Safety Committee, and of workplace-based Work Health Safety Representatives; and reports about workplace safety to each Board meeting. 

·        The CFC’s three advisory committees continued to provide expert strategic advice to the CFC, on a voluntary basis, including through committee-specific meetings and through plenary sessions that brought all three committees together for consultation and planning.

>        Finances : Long-term financial sustainability

·        In 2017–18 the CFC maintained high standards of financial management and reporting. 

·        Own sourced revenue was maximised, with the CFC achieving an outcome of 53.6% compared with a target of 45.9%.  The CFC also achieved a cost to government per visitor outcome of $21.48 compared with a target of $22.87.  

·        Close monitoring of the CFC’s internal budget took place through the work of the Audit Committee, with a formal mid-year review process undertaken in early 2018. 

·        The CFC’s corporate finance area continued to meet deadlines for payroll, theatre show acquittals, accounts payable and collection of receivables. 

·        A number of high quality bids were developed for the 2018–19 ACT Budget, resulting in Budget funding for capital works packages in each of the CFC’s three program areas, as well as a non-capital initiative focused on theatre technical training. 

·        Fundraising efforts continued under the Board’s leadership, with projects funded including the new Hindmarsh Project Space at CMAG’s Civic Square frontage.

>        Assets :  Support for delivering high quality cultural experiences

·        High quality asset management continued to be a key priority for the CFC during 2017–18, in view of its responsibility for major cultural sites. 

·        The CMAG and ACT Historic Places Strategic Asset Management Plans were updated during the year, providing support for the development of Budget bids as well as the basis for longer-term asset management. 

·        Specialist maintenance needs of each site were the focus of the 2017–18 capital upgrade program. 

·        A number of improvements were made to IT assets and programs, especially to the hosting of collection databases. 

·        Work continued on disability access plans for each site and on facilitating access to the sites for those with special needs.  Improved access was also supported through ACT Budget funding.

·        Implementation of the Records Management Program and of the CFC’s Resource Management Plan continued during the year.

Further details regarding outcomes against Strategic Objective 1 and Strategic Indicator 1 are provided under Section B.2.

Strategic Objective 2 – The Canberra Theatre Centre is a leading theatre centre in Australasia and Asia.

Strategic Indicator 2 : The extent to which the Canberra Theatre Centre connects people with theatre experiences of national and international quality, in the following areas.

>        Customers : Audiences that are growing, diverse, engaged and entertained

·        During 2017–18, the Canberra Theatre Centre (the Centre) continued to focus on providing a high-quality experience for its patrons.

·        Post-performance surveys were conducted both on subscription season shows and general hire shows, resulting in approval rates of 95.0% based on patron surveys.  The information gained was used to improve facilities and services. 

·        The Centre’s ticketing software enabled online ticket sales, a high level of security, and the ability for the Centre to undertake research into data. 

·        Patrons with special needs were supported through access initiatives, such as captioning services, audio loops, audio description, tactile tours, Companion Cards, and designated spaces for wheelchair access. 

·        The Centre presented many value-adding activities through the year to enhance the overall patron experience.  These included pre-show forums, post-show question and answer sessions, student “meet and greet” opportunities, and activities for children. 

·        Additional information and signage were provided to assist patrons with parking and accessibility to the Centre during the construction of the Constitution Place project. 

·        Inclusive community programs provided during the year included the Centre’s Social Capital Program, which extended the performing arts experience to those not usually able to attend live theatre, and the Music at Midday concert series, providing a day out for many senior citizens as well as raising money for charity.

>        Programming : A diverse, high quality, entertaining and distinctive program

·        The Centre provided high quality programming through its 2017 and 2018 Subscription Seasons. 

·        The Australian tour of the large-scale musical MAMMA MIA! premiered at the Centre in November 2017 and was the highest grossing musical in Canberra history. 

·       Other subscription season productions at the Centre in 2017–18 included those by : Bangarra Dance Theatre; CIRCA; Sydney Theatre Company; Bell Shakespeare; State Theatre Company of South Australia; Complicité Associates & Bryony Kimmings; Griffin Theatre Company; Brink Productions; and Australian Dance Theatre.  

·        A new focus for the year was on international and national live music acts such as Archie Roach, Jose Gonzalez and Clare Bowditch. 

·        Younger theatre goers were well catered for, through productions such as The 78-Storey Treehouse, The Gruffalo, The Very Hungry Caterpillar, Prehistoric Aquarium, The Funatorium Mad Hatter’s Tea Party, Junk, Meeting Mozart and George’s Marvellous Medicine. 

·        The Centre also supported local artists, including through the Fearless Comedy Gala; Liz Lea’s Reef Up; TEDX Canberra; the Short+Sweet Festival; and Canberra Youth Theatre’s Verbatim.

·        It worked with the Multi-Cultural Festival, Diwali, Moon Cake Festival, Canberra Comedy Festival and the City Renewal Authority to activate Civic Square with a variety of events, including a season of the Spiegeltent, featuring national and internationally touring cabaret, music and comedy performances.

 

>        Business : Venues, systems and people that support high quality live performance

·        During the year, the Centre continued a program of upgrades to retain its functionality and status as a professional performing arts centre. 

·        2017–18 saw the final year of a three-year Stage Three upgrade program, together with a continuing program of capital upgrades. 

·        Major items funded through these programs included : the installation of safety fencing on the Link roof walkway, remodelling of The Playhouse backstage access bathroom, double glazing in the Administration Offices, and upgrades to the internal communications network. 

·        The Centre maintained and developed Box Office services to address business and customer needs, with a particular focus in 2017–18 on implementing measures to address ticket scalping. 

·        Security planning, a review of staffing levels to meet increasing volumes of activity, and improvements to front of house services were other areas of priority attention during the year.

>        Leadership : An integral part of the cultural life of the Canberra region and beyond

·        The Centre achieved strong and consistent venue branding during the year, including for the launch and promotion of its Collected Works Season 2018. 

·        Research continued into the economic impact of the Centre’s activities for the ACT economy, including through analysis of the economic impact of the Canberra season of MAMMA MIA! 

·        Theatre education programs were again a major focus for the Centre in 2017–18, and close connections were maintained with the education sector to provide a range of opportunities for students. 

·        Education initiatives ranged across school drama, vocational education and training, professional learning for teachers, performing arts skills development, work experience, venue tours, the ACT Up! Student Fringe festival of 10-minute plays by students, and the Come Alive festival of museum theatre by young people. 

·        Through the Project O initiative, the Centre supported a group of young women to gain skills and confidence by participating in arts activities.

Further details regarding outcomes against Strategic Objective 2 and Strategic Indicator 2 are provided under Section B.2.

Strategic Objective 3 – CMAG is a leading regional cultural venue in Australia and beyond.


Strategic Indicator 3
: The extent to which CMAG connects people with the Canberra region’s rich and diverse stories, sense of place, and contemporary identity, in the following areas.

>        Customers : Audiences that are growing, diverse and engaged

·        Throughout the year, CMAG focused on providing high-quality experiences for its customers, resulting in a 94.8% approval rate, based on visitor surveying. 

·        CMAG participated in VisitCanberra tourism initiatives, especially by ensuring front of house staff completed the CBR Service Champions program.

·        CMAG’s digital strategy continued to be implemented as a means of improving customer engagement, including digital communications and marketing opportunities, and the use of social media to promote its programs, activities and facilities.  Enhanced digital experiences were also provided for various exhibitions, for example through links to an online catalogue in the exhibition Celebration : 20 years of collecting visual arts at CMAG.

·        CMAG undertook a range of exhibitions and events in partnership with the ACT community, including hosting the annual Capital Arts Patrons Organisation exhibition and auction, and hosting the Children’s Sanctuary for the 2018 National Multicultural Festival.

>        Programming : Exhibitions and programs that reflect Canberra’s unique identity

·        During 2017–18 CMAG provided a wide range of :

o   exhibitions, including :  Eirene Mort : A Livelihood; Unfinished Business; Tiki Takeover and Celebration : 20 years of collecting visual art at CMAG; and

o   education and community programs, such as CMAG on Sunday; floor talks by curators; lectures; film screenings; outreach programs; and workshops focusing on the Nolan Collection.

·        In July 2017, CMAG embarked on the first European tour of one of its exhibitions when Peace, Love and World War : The Denmans, Empire and Australia 1910-1917 toured to King’s College London, where it was opened by the then Australian High Commissioner to the UK, the Hon Alexander Downer AC.

·        New partnerships were an important aspect of the year’s program with exhibitions or displays held in partnership with Canberra Spinners and Weavers, the Australian National Museum of Education, and Red Cross Australia.

>        Stewardship : Venues and collections that allow us to tell the many stories of Canberra

·        During the year, CMAG undertook a capital works project, funded in the 2017–18 ACT Budget, which involved upgrading all its gallery lighting to new LED lighting in order to improve energy efficiency, safety, and conditions for conservation and display standards. 

·        CMAG also implemented a capital upgrade program to ensure continuing safety and high standards of presentation through upkeep and improvement of its assets.  This included the purchase of a defibrillator unit, improved gallery display furniture, and the upgrade of the Foyer PA system.

·        Throughout the year, CMAG continued to care for and develop collections under its stewardship, including through a program of acquisitions to the CMAG Collection featuring a number of significant donations, including works by senior regional artists, Hiroe Swen and
Fay Skyring.

·        Management of the Nolan Collection continued to be a key priority for CMAG throughout the year.  Filming took place in the Nolan Collection Gallery for a new documentary about Nolan in celebration of the 100th anniversary of his birth in 2018, and CMAG’s outreach program based on the Nolan Collection was entered into the Museums and Galleries National Awards.

 

>        Leadership : An integral part of the cultural life of the Canberra region and beyond

·        CMAG marked its 20th anniversary in 2018 with a major celebratory opening for its exhibition Celebration : 20 years of collecting visual art at CMAG.

·        Plans were progressed for a reconfiguration of CMAG’s ground floor, to provide enhanced collection storage and access areas, together with a refitting of CMAG’s upstairs gallery area to make it suitable for long-term displays.  These plans were the basis for a successful bid into the 2018–19 ACT Budget.

·        CMAG’s café was refreshed during the year with changed menu offerings and staffing arrangements.

·        CMAG’s profile was increased nationally and internationally when the Director of CMAG gave presentations at the 2018 Museums and Galleries Australia conference.  CMAG was also recognised during the conference for its leading education programs, one of which, ‘The Art Box’, was celebrated as highly commended in the Museums and Galleries National Awards.

·        Program delivery through strategic partnerships continued to be a key focus for CMAG in 2017–18.  For example, through a new partnership with the City Renewal Authority, CMAG supported the delivery of a Play, Creativity and Culture Symposium, that explored the importance of play in cities.

Further details regarding outcomes against Strategic Objective 3 and Strategic Indicator 3 are provided under Section B.2.

Strategic Objective 4 – The ACT Historic Places are leading historic places in Australia and beyond.

Strategic Indicator 4 : The extent to which ACT Historic Places connects people with the Canberra region’s rich and diverse stories and heritage, in the following areas.

>        Customers : Audiences that are growing, diverse and engaged

·        Throughout the year, ACT Historic Places focused on providing high-quality experiences for its customers, resulting in a 94.9% approval rate, based on visitor surveying.  Data gained from customer surveys were used to improve facilities and services for visitors. 

·        Lanyon Homestead was listed for the first time in Lonely Planet’s Australia Guide, reflecting high quality feedback from visitors.

·        ACT Historic Places’ digital strategy continued to be implemented as a means of improving customer engagement, including new digital guides to the properties, digital marketing opportunities, and use of social media to promote its programs, activities and facilities.

·        New partnerships were developed to help care for the sites and expand programs and services offered to visitors.  These included partnerships with organisations such as Art for Communities, Cuppacumbalong Homestead, ACT Southern Catchment Group, and Buru Ngunawal Aboriginal Corporation.

·        Volunteers contributed 1,380 hours of service during 2017–18, performing duties including collection care, gardening and visitor services.

·        Works were undertaken at Lanyon Homestead and at Lanyon’s Barracks Café and Eating House, improving accessibility for people with limited mobility.

>        Programming : Programs that explore Canberra’s history by interpreting each place

·        During 2017–18 ACT Historic Places provided a wide range of education programs and community programs. Special events and activities included Spring Walk and Talk Series developed in partnership with ACT Parks and Conservation Service, ACT Wildlife and the Canberra District Historical Society; National Trust Open Day at Lanyon Homestead as part of the ACT Heritage Festival; Calthorpes’ House 90th Birthday; Sylvia Curley Oration at Mugga-Mugga; Strings at Sunset with the Lanyon Trio at Lanyon Homestead; The Lanyon Christmas Carols and Picnic; the launch of the 2018 Canberra and Region Heritage Festival at Mugga-Mugga; and the Canoe Tree Walk at Lanyon Homestead with Buru Ngunawal Aboriginal Corporation.

·        The following permanent exhibitions were presented : Lanyon Homestead – Within Living Memory, The Cunningham Photo Album, and Convict Lives; Calthorpes’ House – Calthorpes’ House Orientation Exhibition; and Mugga-Mugga – Getting It Together.

>        Stewardship : Buildings, grounds and collections that are conserved and researched

·        Implementation of Conservation Management Plans for each site continued throughout 2017–18. 

·        Detailed studies, including building condition reports, were commissioned into a range of infrastructure priorities for ACT Historic Places, and these formed the basis of a successful bid into the 2018–19 ACT Budget for a package of capital works across the three sites.

·        A Bushfire Operations Plan was prepared, and was approved by the ACT Emergency Services Commissioner for Lanyon Homestead.

·        Improvements in work health and safety, and emergency response planning were also undertaken.

>        Leadership : An integral part of the cultural life of the Canberra region and beyond

·        Calthorpes’ House celebrated its 90th birthday in September 2017 with a program of activities that highlighted the significance of this property in Canberra’s history and its role as Australia’s best example of a domestic museum of the 1920s.

·        During the year, ACT Historic Places updated its website, imagery and branding with a new tagline Step into the Story. This new branding presents the sites as living cultural landspaces that have continuing relevance and appeal to a wide range of audiences.

·        To increase awareness of the properties, ACT Historic Places worked with the Canberra Visitor Centre, ACT Parks and Conservation Service and VisitCanberra to market tourism and promote special events.

·        Improvements to the physical layout and menu offerings at the Lanyon Café, which was rebranded as the Barracks Espresso Bar and Eating House, and the development of a venue hire information package, provided increased activity and income.

·        The newly opened Lanyon Heritage Centre provided the venue for a series of community talks in spring 2017 and for education programs commencing in autumn 2018, as well as for collection management activities.

Further details regarding outcomes against Strategic Objective 4 and Strategic Indicator 4 are provided under Section B.2, 34.

B.1.5 Outlook

Current and future priorities

Over the coming years the CFC will continue to work towards the following six key priorities, which are identified in the CFC’s 2016-2021 Strategic Plan.

>       Develop a major new theatre for the nation’s capital, with an education program worthy of national theatre status.

>       Bring large-scale theatre shows to Canberra on a regular basis.

>       Extend CMAG’s profile and reach to fulfil its role as the premier museum and gallery for the Canberra region: upgrade its facilities; grow its collection; and double visitation and participation in its programs.

>       Develop Lanyon as a heritage tourist hub and launch the new Lanyon Heritage Centre.

>       Expand our portfolio of historic places and enhance the visitor experience at these places.

>       Play a leading role in the planning of the Civic Square/City Hill cultural precinct, and the wider city centre of Canberra.

In terms of more immediate priorities, issues to be pursued by the CFC in 2018–19 include the following.

>       Working closely with the ACT Treasury, artsACT and other ACT agencies in undertaking a full business case for a major new theatre in Canberra.

>       Playing an active role in other initiatives that contribute to the revitalisation of the city centre, including through working with the City Renewal Authority and other ACT agencies on developing the Civic Arts and Cultural Precinct Plan.

>       Maximising visitation to, access to, and patronage of, the CFC’s facilities, programs and collections.

>       Presenting exhibitions, education and community programs at the museums and galleries managed by the CFC, including through partnership programming and touring activity.

>       Presenting a varied program of performing arts productions at the Canberra Theatre Centre, including by attracting major theatre presentations to Canberra.

>       Maximising non‑government income, both through the CFC’s business operations and by encouraging support to the CFC through sponsorship and philanthropy.

>       Implementing, through a partnership between the Canberra Theatre Centre and the Canberra Institute of Technology, a course to increase training opportunities in Canberra’s stage and theatre industry.

>       Continuing a staged program of upgrades for the Canberra Theatre Centre, to enhance the safety of patrons, ensure a high level of Workplace Health and Safety standards for staff, and implement accessibility improvements.

>       Upgrading infrastructure at Lanyon, to facilitate effective business operations, enhance the visitor experience, support visitors with mobility issues, and achieve high standards of Workplace Health and Safety.

>       Undertaking conservation works at each of the ACT Historic Places.

>       Upgrading CMAG’s storage and display areas, to expand CMAG’s capacity to collect, conserve and exhibit the region’s art and history.

>       Undertaking ongoing programs of other infrastructure upgrades and capital projects, to ensure the CFC’s facilities remain fit for purpose and support the delivery of high quality cultural experiences.

Apart from the areas identified above, the main ongoing priority of the CFC is to achieve its vision and mission, by providing cultural leadership through a high standard of service to the community.  In keeping with this priority, the CFC will continue to promote the value of a vibrant cultural life, not only in terms of serving the existing community of the ACT, but also as a contribution to Canberra’s economic development and its attractiveness as both a business and tourist destination into the future. 

Current and future challenges

2017–18 was a busy and generally successful year for the organisation, with no major problems experienced.  The CFC did, however, deal with a range of challenges during the year, both through managing immediate operational matters and through taking steps to address challenges of a longer term or more strategic nature.  Major current and future challenges are summarised below.

The commencement of the construction phase of the Constitution Place project adjacent to the Canberra Theatre Centre created challenges in terms of its impacts on car parking for theatre patrons, and on access and wayfinding around the construction site.  The noise and vibration of excavation works also presented challenges in terms of their potential to impact on performances, especially in the Courtyard Studio, which is the Centre’s venue closest to the construction site, and on staff working in the Centre’s administration offices above the Courtyard Studio.

The CFC took a number of measures to address these challenges.  It liaised closely with the project developers to ensure easy access and wayfinding around the construction site, and to avoid excavation work at performance times wherever possible.  Double glazing was installed in office areas closest to the site, to minimise the noise impact on staff.  The CFC also worked with other ACT Government agencies to mitigate the loss of surface car parks during the project’s construction phase, including through the installation of a new car park adjacent to The Playhouse, and the provision of information to theatre patrons about other parking options in the city centre.

Major capital works projects undertaken by the CFC itself during the year presented challenges in terms of the need to ensure operational continuity during the works programs.  For example, the installation of new LED lighting at CMAG needed to be scheduled to avoid impacts on exhibition programming.  By year end, however, all capital works projects had been successfully implemented and the CFC had fully expended all its 2017–18 capital works funding.

Managing the impact of capital works programs will be a key challenge in the coming years as the CFC rolls out a series of major projects, funded in the 2018–19 Budget, across all its sites.

Another major challenge for the organisation relates to the physical security of visitors and staff at the CFC’s venues, which are all open to the public.  During 2018–19, the CFC will implement a comprehensive new security policy, plan and procedures, based on detailed risk assessments undertaken at each of its sites during 2017.  These will also be informed by the outcomes of a performance audit of physical security undertaken by the Auditor‑General in 2017–18, in which the CFC was one of the audited agencies.

Increasing energy costs represent a further challenge to the CFC in terms of upward pressure on its budget.  The specialised nature of the CFC’s activities, including the need to light theatrical performances and to maintain consistent climate control for collection items, presents challenges in terms of reducing energy costs.  The CFC will, however, continue to implement a Resource Management Plan to ensure it manages its energy use as efficiently as possible.  The replacement of CMAG’s outdated lighting system in 2017–18, with new LED lighting that meets contemporary energy efficiency standards, is one example of action successfully taken under the Plan.

The CFC will address these, and other risks, to the best of its ability, including through its Strategic Risk Management Plan.  This Plan informs the prioritisation of projects for internal audit programs and is supported by other plans, such as those covering Fraud Control, Business Continuity, Disaster Preparedness and Security. 

Apart from specific risks and challenges, the main continuing challenge for the CFC remains the variability and unpredictability of the performing arts business, which impacts directly on the CFC's main non-government income source: its theatre-related revenues.  

The creation of a Theatre Reserve in 2012 is a key strategy that the CFC has put in place in seeking to manage the unpredictability of its income levels.  The Reserve has since been increased where good theatre trading results have allowed this and now stands at $1.1 million, providing a robust means of managing the risks inherent in theatre programming, as well as supporting efforts to bring a wider range of shows into the Canberra market.

B.1.6 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Reporting

The CFC ensures cultural diversity is part of regular programming, including exhibitions, theatre presentations and programs featuring Indigenous cultures.  Examples of activities in each area of the CFC in 2017–18 are provided below.

Canberra Theatre Centre

>          The Centre continued to present a diverse range of performances developed by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander companies and examining themes of reconciliation.  Productions in
2017–18 included :

·         Marrugeku Gudirr Gudirr;

·         Archie Roach & Tiddas;

·         The Bleeding Tree; and

·         Ilbijerri Theatre Company Coranderrk.

 

>          The Centre continued its 26 year relationship with Bangarra Dance Theatre to deliver the highly successful season of Bennelong, which won seven Helpmann awards.  The Centre distributed 40 social capital tickets for the show to students, including through the Indigenous Engagement Officer at McGregor and Macquarie Primary School.

>          The Centre presented the ground-breaking new work by female Indigenous play wright and actor Nakkiah Lui titled Black is the New White.  The production delivered a contemporary perspective on race relations and showcased leading Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island actors including Tony Briggs, Luke Carroll, Shari Sebbens, Melodie Reynolds-Diarra and Nakkiah Lui.  The Centre distributed eight social capital tickets for the show to the ANU National Centre for Indigenous Studies.

>          The Centre developed and presented sold out concerts of renowned Indigenous musicians Archie Roach & Tiddas and a foyer event with Briggs: Bad Apples House Party in partnership with Reconciliation Australia on the eve of the inaugural ACT Reconciliation Day public holiday.

>          The Centre worked alongside the Multicultural Festival 2018 to present a pre-festival showcase featuring Indigenous Australian rapper and dancer Baker Boy, performing original hip-hop songs incorporating both English and Yolŋu Matha.

>          The Centre hosted the Spiegeltent in Civic Square in May 2018, which featured a performance by Australian singer-songwriter, Gawurra, hailing from Milingimbi Island, North East Arnhem Land.  A Yolngu man, he sings in Gupapuyngu language.

CMAG

>          As a part of the inaugural ACT Reconciliation Day holiday celebrations, CMAG presented a specially developed itinerary of ‘six things to see at CMAG on Reconciliation Day 2018’. This highlighted significant material on display that either told stories of Indigenous people or was produced by Aboriginal artists.  The itinerary included objects in the Canberra Stories Gallery and the exhibitions Celebration: 20 years of collecting visual art at CMAG, and Unfinished Business.

>          CMAG delivered the early childhood learning program, What Do Artists Make?, to early childhood school groups from Preschool and Foundation within the gallery spaces and studio. The program referenced a number of Indigenous works within the Canberra Stories Gallery and pre-visit information packs outlined the links to the ACT Curriculum framework : Every chance to learn: Curriculum framework for ACT schools.

>          CMAG partnered with Red Cross Australia ACT to launch the 2018 ACT Schools Reconciliation Challenge and to publicly display and celebrate the Reconciliation Day Community Canvas.

>          The CMAG Advisory Committee discussed CMAG’s engagement with and representation of Indigenous peoples, and agreed to establish a working group including individuals with relevant external expertise to develop an action plan for presentation to the Committee in 2019.

>          CMAG Director, Shane Breynard hosted a tour of CMAG for staff of the ACT Office for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Affairs.

>          A painting was acquired for the CMAG Collection by local Indigenous artist Uncle Jimmy Williams. Uncle Jimmy William’s designs depicting the flight of the Bogong moth are used on the seat fabric for Canberra’s new light rail vehicles and new buses.

ACT Historic Places

>          ACT Historic Places benefited from input by Indigenous representatives in a project to remove graffiti from an historic Scar Tree at Lanyon.

>          ACT Historic Places established a partnership with Tyrone Bell from Dharwra Aboriginal Cultural Tours and Wally Bell from Buru-Ngunawal Aboriginal Corporation to provide visitors with the opportunity to undertake a walking tour of Lanyon Historic Precinct and gain an insight into the importance of the Murrumbidgee River and the mountains to Ngunnawal community.

>          Indigenous cultural awareness training was provided for ACT Historic Places Staff by Wally Bell, Elder, Buru-Ngunawal Aboriginal Corporation.

B.1.7 Internal Accountability

Senior Management of the CFC

The senior management team of the CFC comprises the following positions :

>        the Chief Executive Officer;

>        the Chief Finance Officer;

>        the Director, CMAG and Corporate Strategy;

>        the Director, Canberra Theatre Centre; and

>        the Director, ACT Historic Places

 

The names and information about the occupants of these positions are provided at Appendix 1 (for the Chief Executive Officer, as a CFC Board member) and Appendix 2 (for the other four senior management positions).  Information about remuneration for the Chief Executive Officer, as the only senior executive position in the CFC, is provided at Appendix 1.

 

The responsibilities of each senior management position are reflected in the organisational chart.  Further information relating to the structure of the organisation is provided at Section B.1.3.

 

The senior managers meet as a Senior Management committee every fortnight to discuss matters of CFC-wide interest.  Other significant committees of the CFC include the Work Health and Safety Committee (refer to Section B.7), the Agency Consultative Committee, and the Security Executive Group.

Board of the CFC

Composition

Section 10 of the CFC Act provides for the CFC Board to have seven members.

The Chair, Deputy Chair, and four Members of the CFC Board are appointed by the Minister in accordance with the provisions of the Financial Management Act 1996 (the FM Act), Sections 78-79.  The CFC’s Chief Executive Officer is also a Member of the CFC Board in accordance with Section 80 of the FM Act.

The functions of the Chair, Deputy Chair, Chief Executive Officer, and associated provisions relating to Board Members, are set out in the FM Act (Division 9.3).

Details of the CFC Board’s membership and remuneration during 2017–18 are provided at Appendix 1.  The CFC’s Governance Charter is available at http://www.culturalfacilities.act.gov.au.

Meetings

The CFC’s Board meetings are convened and conducted in accordance with the provisions of the FM Act (Division 9.4).

A schedule of the CFC’s Board meetings held during 2017–18, and information about attendances at these meetings, is at Appendix 1.

Governance Charter

The Board has adopted the following to guide its operations and performance :

>        Governance Framework;

>        Board Charter; and

>        Board Code of Conduct

These documents are included in the CFC’s Governance Charter, which is available at http://www.culturalfacilities.act.gov.au.

Audit Committee of the Board

The CFC has established the Audit Committee as a sub-committee of the Board, with a formal charter setting out its role and functions in relation to oversight of financial, audit, and compliance matters, including risk management and internal controls.

A copy of the Audit Committee Charter is provided as part of the Governance Charter available at http://www.culturalfacilities.act.gov.au.  Membership details and a schedule of meetings held during 2017–18 are provided at Section B.5.

Advisory Committees

The CFC has established three Advisory Committees, in accordance with Section 8 (i)(a) of the CFC Act, to provide expert strategic advice in relation to their respective specialist areas.

The committees include :

Name of Committees

Role of Committees

 

CMAG Advisory Committee

 


To provide the CFC Board with expert strategic advice, within the context of the CFC’s Strategic Plan for 2016-21 and its annual Corporate Plans.

 

The committees provide expert advice and assistance on a voluntary basis.  This support is valuable in contributing to the CFC’s policy development, business planning and community participation activities.

 

 

Historic Places Advisory Committee

 

Canberra Theatre Centre Advisory Committee

The Committees were appointed for a three year term to 30 June 2019.

The advisory committees’ first meeting of the year was held as a plenary strategic workshop, which included a presentation by the CFC’s CEO, together with breakout sessions to allow the committees to meet individually.  Individual advisory committee meetings were held throughout the year and the final meeting of the 2017–18 year for the committees comprised a further plenary session, focused on corporate planning for 2018–19.

In 2017–18, members of the three advisory committees donated approximately 101 hours of time in total.

The Charter for the advisory committees is provided as part of the Governance Charter available at http://www.culturalfacilities.act.gov.au.

Advisory Committee memberships, together with information about advisory committee meetings held during 2017–18, are provided at Appendix 3.

Further information about the operation of the advisory committees, including their interaction with the CFC Board, is provided under Section B.2 below.


B.2 Performance Analysis

The CFC’s 2017-18 Statement of Intent was prepared in accordance with Section 61 of the FM Act and published in the 2017-18 ACT Budget papers.   The Statement of Intent identifies the CFC’s strategic objectives and indicators.  The Statement of Performance found at Attachment 1, provides details of how these strategic objectives and indicators were achieved in 2017-18.  These are summarised under Section B.1.4.

Below are the performance measures, targets and results for the CFC’s key performance indicators from 2014–2018.

Figure B.2a : Estimated number of visitors/patrons to CFC facilities/programs

There has been an upward trend in the estimated number of visitors/patrons to the CFC over the past four years.  The large number achieved in 2016-17 reflected the many visitors to CMAG touring exhibitions that year.  2017–18 saw a return to a more normal pattern of usage, with 405,690 visitors/patrons to CFC facilities and programs, a figure 6% above target.

Figure B.2b : Number of exhibitions at facilities managed by the CFC

       

The number of exhibitions at facilities managed by the CFC has reduced over the past four years as a result of extending the display period for some exhibitions, and due to some impacts of capital works projects on the availability of gallery spaces.  The outcome of 19 exhibitions for 2017–18 was slightly lower than the target of 20.  Results do not include outgoing touring CMAG exhibitions, for example the tour of the CMAG exhibition Peace, Love and World War: The Denmans, Empire and Australia 1910–1917 to King’s College, London.

Figure B.2c : Numbers of education and community programs provided by the CFC

The number of education and community programs provided by the CFC have been reducing to a more sustainable level over the past four years.  Demand for these programs remains strong, with an outcome of 596 programs delivered in 2017–18, 15% above target.

Figure B.2d : Number of days venue usage at the Canberra Theatre Centre’s venues

Increased programming has led to higher usage of the venues of the Canberra Theatre Centre over the past four years.  There were 691 days of venue usage in 2017–18, 14% higher than the target.

 

Figure B.2e : Customer satisfaction with quality of services provided by the CFC, as measured by annual survey

Customer satisfaction levels over the past four years have been above target, reflecting attempts by each venue to achieve as high a standard as possible.  The level for 2017–18 was 95%, 6% above target.

Figure B.2f : Cost to Government per estimated visitor/patron to CFC facilities/programs

There has been a downwards trend in the Cost to Government per estimated visitor/patron over the past four years, reflecting increased visitation patterns.  The 2016-17 figure reflects the many visitors to CMAG touring exhibitions discussed above. In
2017–18, the figure was $21.48 against a target of $22.87.

Figure B.2g : Own Sourced Revenue as a Proportion of Total Revenue for the Corporation


The percentage of the CFC’s revenue that is owned sourced has increased over the past four years, primarily as a result of higher theatre incomes.  In 2017–18, the figure was 53.6%, against a target of 45.9%.


 


 

CORPORATE/finance/hr
AT A GLANCE

STAFF
RETENTION RATE

86%

QUALITY OF SERVICE

95%
of visitors satisfied with quality of the CFC’s services

FINANCE

·         Almost 5,000 invoices processed for payments totalling more than $20.8 million.

·         178 theatre show acquittals


GENDER BALANCE OF EMPLOYEES

Female 57%
Male 43%


OWN SOURCED REVENUE

53.6%

 


ADVISORY COMMITTEES

21 members donated 101.5 hours



6 BOARD
MEETINGS

6 AUDIT COMMITTEE MEETINGS


PAYROLL

·         270 in full-time, part-time or casual employment throughout the year

·         5,947 individual pays

·         66 new employees placed into the payroll system

 



CFC 20 YEARS
1997-2017

7,000,000 visitors to our venues and programs


The following section analyses in detail the CFC’s performance against the CFC, Canberra Theatre Centre, CMAG and ACT Historic Places mission/purpose statements as set out in the CFC’s 2017–18 Corporate Plan, which in turn is based on the CFC’s 2016–21 Strategic Plan.

In each case, the start of the section (What we are, What we do and Our vision) and the shaded area (Strategies to achieve this) sets out the long-term strategies identified in the 2016-21 Strategic Plan. The next area (Actions) contains the specific actions identified in the 2017-18 Corporate Plan to work towards the long-term strategies during the course of 2017-18.  The final area (Results) reports on the results achieved against the specific actions for 2017-18.

B.2.1 CULTURAL FACILITIES CORPORATION (CFC)

What we are : an enterprise of the ACT Government that manages a number of Canberra’s major cultural facilities

 

What we do : we connect people with rich and diverse cultural experiences through activities at our venues

 

Our vision : to provide cultural leadership in the Canberra region and beyond

LeadershipA cultural leader in the ACT region and beyond

Strategies to achieve this :

>        Play a key role in planning the Civic Square/City Hill cultural precinct, and the wider city centre, emphasising the importance of car parking for visitors to our city-based facilities.

>        Provide leadership in cultural planning, administration and management.

>        Contribute to major policies, reviews and studies that are relevant to our cultural leadership role, highlighting the importance of the arts to economic and social wellbeing.

Actions

Results

Work with the developer of the Constitution Place project to :

·         minimise impacts of this project on the CFC’s city-based facilities during the construction phase, in terms of pedestrian and vehicle access, construction noise and vibration, and car parking availability

·         maximise benefits of the completed project for the CFC, in terms of car parking availability and services for visitors, patrons, and visiting theatre companies, including pre- and post-theatre dining and hotel accommodation.

During 2017–18 the CFC worked closely with the Constitution Place project team to reduce the impact of the construction phase on the CFC’s city-based facilities and to seek mutual benefits from the completed project.

 

Strategic discussions were held with the head of the project – Richard Snow, Head of Property, Canberra Airport – at the CFC Board’s October 2017 and April 2018 meetings.  Regular operational contact was also made between staff of Canberra Theatre Centre and the project team on matters such as access and wayfinding around the construction site, and the scheduling of theatre performances.  This close cooperation and collaborative planning of excavation works around performance times minimised the impact of noise and vibration on theatre operations.

Work with other ACT Government agencies to put in place temporary car parking arrangements to mitigate the removal of car parks during the Constitution Place project.

The CFC worked with other ACT Government agencies in facilitating car parking arrangements during the Constitution Place construction phase.  This resulted in the development of a temporary car park next to The Playhouse, and the reconfiguration of the existing adjacent car park to provide additional parking spaces.

 

The Canberra Theatre Centre used its website and pre-show emails to ticketholders to update patrons on changing car parking arrangements.

Engage with the newly established City Renewal Authority (CRA) on the revitalisation of Civic and on cultural planning for the city.

The CFC worked closely with the CRA on the revitalisation of Civic and planning of longer term initiatives.

 

Malcolm Snow, CEO of the CRA, attended the February 2018 meeting of the CFC Board to brief members on the CRA’s work and for strategic discussions on matters of mutual interest to the two agencies.  This was one of several meetings between CFC and CRA representatives throughout the year. These discussions contributed to the development of the Project Brief for the new Civic Arts and Cultural Precinct Plan.

 

CFC program areas actively engaged with CRA to contribute to the cultural life of the city. CMAG partnered with the CRA and Play Activation Network ACT to present the ‘Play, Creativity and Culture’ symposium and also participated in Enlighten in the City, which was coordinated through the CRA.  The Canberra Theatre Centre worked with the CRA to host the Spiegeltent for a season of performances in Civic Square.

Participate in the planning of Light Rail stages 1 and 2, to maximise their benefits for the CFC’s city-based facilities.

The CFC continued to explore the benefits of the Light Rail project for its facilities and, during Transport Canberra’s consultation phase, submitted preferred route options for Light Rail Stage 2.

Work with Civic Square neighbours, including Craft ACT, ACT Legislative Assembly, Theo Notaras Multicultural Centre and Civic Library, on cooperative activities and issues of mutual interest.

CMAG participated in a partnership with the National Multicultural Festival, ACT Government Child and Family Centres, ACT Community Language Schools Association, Libraries ACT and others to present the Children’s Sanctuary at the 2018 National Multicultural Festival.

Implement the Reconciliation Action Plan of the Chief Minister, Treasury and Economic Development Directorate, as it relates to the CFC.

The CFC undertook a number of activities in support of the Reconciliation Action Plan and featured Indigenous narratives in events at each of its three main program areas.  Further details are provided in Section B.1.6.

Deliver, with The Childers Group, an Arts Value Forum on communicating and realising the value of the arts, and use this to convey key messages about the CFC’s role in cultural leadership.

The Arts Value Forum was held in July 2017 in the Canberra Theatre Centre. The Forum attracted over 100 people and was opened by Kathy Leigh, Head of the ACT Public Service. Over 20 presenters were joined by keynote speaker Kate Fielding, Chair of Regional Arts Australia and board member of the Australia Council for the Arts.

Explore the scope for further collaborative projects between the CFC and The Childers Group, including a potential arts leadership event in late 2017, focusing on governance in the arts.

CFC is participating in discussions regarding opportunities to present a similar arts leadership event in 2018–19.

Further develop collaborations with cultural and tourist bodies including: peak cultural bodies, national cultural institutions, other cultural organisations, tourism organisations and diplomatic missions, to extend the CFC’s profile and involvement in cultural and tourism sector initiatives.

During the year, the CEO was a member of the :

·         Australiana Fund National Council and Canberra Committee

·         Tourism Leaders Forum and Tourism Industry Advisory Council of the Canberra Business Chamber

·         Cambridge Society of the ACT (Chair)

·         External Advisory Board of the ANU College of Business and Economics

 

The Director, Canberra Theatre Centre, was a member of the :

·         Live Performance Australia Executive Council

·         Executive Council of the Association of Asia Pacific Performing Arts Centres

The Director, CMAG, was a member of the UNESCO Australian Memory of the World Committee.

The Assistant Director, Exhibitions and Collections, CMAG, was a member of the DISACT (Disaster ACT) Disaster Recovery Committee.

 

The Senior Curator, Social History, CMAG was Vice President of the ACT Committee of Museums Galleries Australia.

 

The Education Officer, Canberra Theatre Centre, was a member of the ACT Drama Teachers Association Board.

Explore how the CFC can contribute to the success of, and gain benefits from, direct international flights to Canberra.

The Director, CMAG, and the Canberra Theatre Centre’s Program Manager and Program Producer attended the Australia–Singapore Cultural Leaders’ Forum in Adelaide in September 2017 where they participated in discussions on cultural exchange and joint projects, including with Singapore museums, galleries and theatre companies.

Celebrate the CFC’s 20th birthday in November 2017, focusing on the organisation’s achievements and leadership role.

CMAG 20th_043

Minister Ramsay, John Hindmarsh AM, Gary Humphries, Bill Wood AM,  Don Aitkin AO and Harriet Elvin celebrating the CFC’s 20th birthday

The CFC’s 20th anniversary in November 2017 celebrated the organisation’s achievements and leadership role, and looked to future directions.  A 20th birthday party on 3 November 2017 was held in the Canberra Theatre Centre.  Guests included the Chief Minister, Minister Ramsay, Opposition Leader, former Arts Ministers, MLAs, Head of the ACT Public Service, and many current and former CFC Board members, advisory committee members, staff and volunteers.

 

The Canberra Times Panorama magazine published an extended story on the history and future aims of the CFC.  This was distributed internationally via Arts Hub.

 

Strategy A clear direction for our future

Strategies to achieve this :

>        Use the Strategic Plan as the basis for our annual corporate plans.

>        Use the Strategic Plan to guide the work of the Board, advisory committees, staff and volunteers.

>        Monitor and report on progress towards the Strategic Plan on a regular basis.

>        Use the Strategic Plan to guide how we communicate with our stakeholders.

Actions

Results

Report on achievement of the 2017–18 Corporate Plan in the 2017–18 Annual Report.

Information compiled during the year has been used as the basis for reporting against the 2017–18 Corporate Plan in this 2017–18 Annual Report.

 

Implement the ACT Government Service performance management system, linking all performance agreements to the 2017–18 Corporate Plan.

The performance management system linked to the 2017–18 Corporate Plan was implemented to ensure that all staff were aware of the relationship between their roles and the organisation’s corporate goals.

The CEO’s ‘start the year’ email for 2018 reminded staff of the importance of performance management and the need for every member of staff to have a completed Performance Management Plan.

Develop a Corporate Plan for 2018–19, based on the Strategic Plan, with input from staff and volunteers.

Workshops to gain the input of staff and Advisory Committees to the 2018–19 Corporate Plan were held during June 2018.

 

The June 2018 meeting of the CFC Board considered the draft 2018–19 Corporate Plan and the final plan is now available on the CFC website. 

Implement the CFC’s five-year Communications Strategy based on the Strategic Plan.

The CFC’s communications activities during 2017–18 were informed by the 2017–22 Communications Strategy.

Ensure the CFC’s web portal is an up-to-date source of information about the organisation, including key corporate documents.

Updates to the CFC web portal included the upload of key documents and revisions to meet the needs of open access information requirements under the Freedom of Information Act 2016.

 

Governance An accountable and dynamic organisation

Strategies to achieve this :

>        Ensure that our governance systems provide a high standard of accountability.

>        Maintain the Board at full strength, with members who are skilled, diverse, well informed and committed to continuous improvement.

>        Focus on performance as well as conformance at Board level.

Action

Results

Review and, if necessary, update the Governance Charter.

The CFC’s Governance Charter was reviewed.  These changes enabled the Audit Committee to include an external member with specialised skills.

Plan for forthcoming Board membership renewals, including through a board skills audit.

The CFC worked closely with Minister Ramsay and artsACT to implement a Board renewal process. Detailed position descriptions for the Chair, Deputy Chair and Member roles were developed to identify key skills and attributes needed.  A public Expression of Interest process for current and forthcoming CFC Board vacancies was conducted in May 2018, and appointments are expected to be finalised in the first half of 2018–19.

Ensure Board meeting agendas focus on performance as well as conformance. Seek continual improvement in the presentation of Board agenda papers.

Procedural improvements were made to simplify and streamline the presentation of information in Board agenda papers. The introduction of executive summary sections into a number of reports allowed key points to be made against a series of strategic questions agreed by the Board as representing the areas for primary focus.

Arrange for the CFC’s external auditors to meet with the Board after the audit of the 2016–17 Financial Statements and Statement of Performance.

A representative of the ACT Audit Office briefed the Audit Committee at the Committee’s September 2017 meeting on the audit of the CFC’s 2016–17 Financial Statements and 2016–17 Statement of Performance.

 

As no major issues arose in this briefing, it was agreed that the Chair of the Audit Committee would brief the Board about the outcomes of the audit and there was no need for ACT Audit Office representatives to attend a full Board meeting.

Invite the CFC’s external auditors to each meeting of the Board’s Audit Committee.

Representatives of the ACT Audit Office were invited to all, and attended most, meetings of the Audit Committee during 2017–18.

Implement an internal audit program and an expanded quality assurance program, focusing on key areas of risk.

The CFC’s internal audit/quality assurance program for the year focused on key risks identified through its Strategic Risk Management Plan, Fraud Control Plan and Audit Committee discussions.

Participate in Auditor-General performance audits that relate to the CFC’s operations, including performance audits of public art and of performance indicators.

The CFC provided information to the ACT Audit Office for performance audits relating to public art, performance indicators, and physical security.  The CFC also reviewed and commented on draft audit reports.  Further details are provided under Section B.3 Scrutiny.

Review and update the Strategic Risk Management Plan and Fraud Control Plan.

The Audit Committee reviewed the Strategic Risk Management and Fraud Control Plans at its May 2018 meeting and the revised and updated Plans were approved by the Board at its June 2018 meeting.

Remind staff of their responsibilities for fraud control, including through fraud awareness training and emails from the CEO and CFO.

The CEO’s 2018 ‘start the year’ email reminded staff of their responsibilities with regard to appropriate use of CFC resources.

 

The CFC conducted Fraud and Corruption awareness training for staff in 2018.

Review the CFC’s security risks and consolidate the CFC’s security arrangements into a comprehensive and updated Security Plan and Procedures.

Security risk assessments were completed in 2017–18 for the five CFC sites.  A further risk assessment was completed for the Corporate functions and Office of the CEO.

 

Security planning workshops were held in 2017–18 and resulted in the preparation of draft Physical Security and Personnel Security policies, which will be finalised in 2018–19.  These policies will draw on outcomes of the 2017–18 performance audit of physical security.

 

The CFC’s Senior Managers formed the Security Executive Group to discuss security matters on a fortnightly basis.

 

People An employer of choice

Strategies to achieve this :

>        Attract, develop and retain staff and volunteers who are highly skilled and passionate about their work.

>        Ensure our workplace is safe and rewarding for staff and volunteers.

Actions

Results

Ensure a supportive working environment, including by implementing the Respect, Equity and Diversity Framework and the ACT Government Service performance management system.

The CEO’s 2018 ‘start the year’ email emphasised the need to adhere to the Code of Conduct, to display appropriate behaviour in dealing with members of the public and colleagues, and to have performance plans in place for all staff.  This message was reinforced by linking the CFC’s in-house awards scheme, the Don Aitkin Awards, to the display of public sector values.

Ensure sound human resource management, including by :

·         implementing the updated CFC’s Human Resource Management Plan;

·         continuing a rolling review and updating of human resource policies;

·         proactively providing staff with a range of training and professional development opportunities; recognising staff contributions and achievements, including through award schemes such as the Don Aitkin Award, linking this to the CFC’s 20th birthday in 2017; and

·         reviewing resource sharing between CMAG and Historic Places after a year in operation.

CFC staff participated in a range of training/staff development/ networking programs in 2017–18. Staff are regularly invited to sit on judging panels, open exhibitions and deliver lectures at other institutions.

 

The following activities were undertaken by CFC senior staff:

 

The CEO :

·         was inducted into the ANU College of Business and Economics Alumni Hall of Fame;

·         spoke at the ANU College of Business and Economics graduation;

·         was a panellist at the 2017 Executive Assistant Network Canberra conference and at the Arts Value Forum; and

·         opened the exhibitions Patterns in nature and Rapt in Felt : Our Stories, both featuring works by ACT and region artists.

 

The Director, CMAG, participated in a specialist session on building inclusive and diverse teams hosted by the Canberra Business Chamber.

 

The Director, ACT Historic Places, spoke and gave lectures to various organisations including the National Trust AGM, the ACT ICOMOS conference, the International Women’s Club, the ANU and the ACT Heritage Symposium.

 

The 2017 Don Aitkin Awards presentation took place in December 2017 in the presence of Emeritus Professor Don Aitkin AO, former Chairman of the CFC. The award winners were Lynn Carroll, Rohan Cutler and
Shaya Dashtinezhad.

Continue to implement workplace health and safety and injury management improvement strategies, with regular reports to the CFC Board, including by implementing the CFC’s Total Workplace Health and Safety Management System and holding quarterly meetings of the CFC’s Workplace Health and Safety Committee.

During 2017–18, a report on workplace safety was provided at all Board meetings and a further report on key safety risks identified for CFC workplaces, and how these risks are being managed was provided to the Board every six months.

 

The CFC Work Health and Safety Committee met in August and November 2017 and in February and May 2018. Invitations to these meetings were extended to representatives from the Community and Public Sector Union and the Media, Entertainment and Arts Alliance. CFC area meetings of HSR representatives were held throughout the year.

 

Wellbeing in the Workplace initiatives continued to be implemented in the CFC, including :

·         promotion of the new Employee Assistance Provider services for employees;

·         an alcohol-free Melbourne Cup event in November 2017; and

·         flu vaccinations in April 2018.

Provide volunteers with training, support and recognition, including through award schemes such as the Don Aitkin Award, linking this to the CFC’s 20th birthday in 2017.

Volunteers at Lanyon, Calthorpes’ House and Mugga-Mugga served a total of 1,380 hours in 2017–18.  The CFC provided volunteers with a meeting and training day in November 2017 and June 2018, an International Women’s Day morning tea and a Christmas brunch.  Two CFC volunteers were honoured with nominations for the Don Aitkin Award in December 2017.

 

Refer to Appendix 3, for information regarding the CFC’s advisory committees, the members of which are all volunteers.

Support the CFC’s three advisory committees and seek their advice on a range of strategic directions for the CFC, recognising that the committees provide expert advice to the CFC and involve the wider community in the organisation.

The first advisory committee meeting of 2017–18 was held as a plenary strategic planning workshop for all three committees in November 2017. The workshop included a presentation by the CEO.

 

The three committees met for individual sessions on the following dates : CMAG Advisory Committee, 24 May 2018; Canberra Theatre Centre Advisory Committee, 13 July 2017, 20 March 2018; and ACT Historic Places Advisory Committee, 20 November 2017, 6 February 2018,
27 March 2018, 8 May 2018. The committees reconvened for a plenary session in June 2018 to focus on corporate planning for 2018–19.

 

Finances Long-term financial sustainability

Strategies to achieve this :

>        Maintain high standards of financial management and reporting.

>        Maximise both government and own-sourced income, to ensure financial sustainability and support future growth.

>        Ensure all our customers – both internal and external – are paid accurately and promptly.

Actions

Results

Achieve financial outcomes that : minimise the cost to Government per visitor/patron; maximise own-sourced revenue; maintain appropriate working capital; and allow, where possible, business upgrades funded internally.

The CFC achieved a cost to government per estimated visitor/patron of $21.48, which was better than the target of $22.87.  Own sourced revenue of 53.6% surpassed the target of 45.9%.  Details and variance explanations are provided in the Statement of Performance at Attachment 1.

Implement and monitor an internal budget for 2017–18 with strategies to address the long-term financial sustainability of the CFC. Introduce improved arrangements for month-end closures, to increase the timeliness and accuracy of financial reporting.

The 2017–18 internal budget included strategies to address salary and CPI increases.  The Audit Committee monitored the internal budget throughout the year and provided progress reports to each Board meeting.  Mid-year reviews of the internal budget took place in January and February 2018.

Achieve prompt and efficient processing of payroll, theatre show acquittals, account payments, and collection of receivables. Explore an improved timesheet system and an additional HR module for the payroll system.

The Corporate Finance area continued to meet deadlines relating to payroll, theatre show acquittals, accounts payments and the collection of receivables.  A project has commenced on an online solution to improve timesheet, rostering and payroll management.

Increase the Theatre Reserve at the end of 2017–18, if good theatre trading results and the overall health of the CFC budget allow this.

Due to the extension of theatre programming into new areas of performance such as contemporary music, no further increase was made to the Theatre Reserve in 2017–18.

Develop high-quality bids for the 2018–19 ACT Budget process, for strategic initiatives that address the priorities identified by the Minister for the Arts and Community Events and lead to better cultural outcomes for the community. Engage colleagues from ACT Treasury at an early stage of developing these bids, to ensure they are clearly expressed, well targeted and accurately costed.

CFC bids for the 2018–19 ACT Budget process resulted in the following CFC initiatives being funded in the 2018–19 ACT Budget :

·         $680,000 capital over one year – Conserving and improving Canberra’s Historic Places;

·         $350,000 capital over two years – Upgrading CMAG storage;

·         $1,480,000 capital over three years – Upgrading the Canberra Theatre Centre;

·         $45,000 non-capital in first year, then $20,000 ongoing – Conserving and improving Canberra’s Historic Places; and

·         $145,000 non-capital over two years – Vocational training for stage and theatre.

Progress the CFC’s fundraising efforts under the Board’s leadership and using the opportunities of significant anniversaries such as the 20th birthday of CMAG as a focus for these efforts, including for the Canberra Region Treasures Fund.

The CFC’s 2017–18 Priority Fundraising Project Plans provided the framework for the year’s fundraising efforts, under the Board’s guidance. Successful fundraising projects for the year generated support for :

·         a short documentary film on Calthorpes’ House;

·         Christmas carols and picnic at Lanyon;

·         conservation of CMAG’s Soares collection of social history items

·         rebadging of CMAG’s external gallery on Civic Square as the Hindmarsh Project Space.

 

Assets Support for delivering high quality cultural experiences

Strategies to achieve this :

>        Maintain high standards of asset management.

>        Achieve high standards of disability access.

>        Ensure IT systems deliver business outcomes.

>        Review and improve administrative, financial and customer service systems.

Actions

Results

Implement the updated Strategic Asset Management Plan and use this as the basis for capital bids into the 2018–19 ACT Budget process.

Strategic asset management plans for CMAG, Calthorpes’ House, Mugga-Mugga and Lanyon were updated in 2017–18, and these supported bids into the 2018–19 ACT Budget.

 

The Canberra Theatre Centre’s Strategic Asset Management Plan was updated in 2016–17.

Implement cyclical maintenance programs at each site.

Cyclical maintenance needs informed priorities for the 2017–18 capital upgrade program.

Finalise and implement Access Action Plans for each site.

Work progressed on access action plans for each site during the year and resulted in a range of improvements and a successful bid for funding for improvements to access and facilities at the Centre.

Monitor IT assets across the CFC to ensure right fit with internal and externally provided solutions. Seek efficiencies through improved service arrangements and best-fit hardware and software solutions. Implement the update to Windows 10 operating platform and
Office 13.

IT assets continued to be monitored for best cost-effectiveness use.

 

Improved hosting arrangements for the CMAG and Historic Places collection databases will allow for enhanced usability, functionality and security at a reduced cost.

Continue to implement, and further review, Business Continuity Plans and Disaster Recovery Plans.

Updated versions of the CFC’s Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery plans will be provided to the Audit Committee and Board early in
2018–19.

Implement the Records Management Plan, provide staff with updated training, continue the rollout of the Electronic Records Management System to remaining staff, and ensure record disposal schedules are actioned, to reduce the volume of records in storage.

All staff have been advised of the Records Management Program and their responsibilities to keep accurate records.  CFC officers have been designated as the CFC’s records managers, to assist staff and ensure compliance with records management procedures.

 

A staff representative from the CFC attended various Records and Information Management Community of Practice sessions throughout the year.

Finalise and implement a new Resource Management Plan as the basis for encouraging sustainability practices, reducing energy consumption and mitigating the impact of increases in electricity and gas prices.

The CFC’s Resource Management Plan was finalised and now provides the framework for the CFC’s sustainability and energy efficiency practices.


2017 18 Fin Year Infographics w history stats title changev2

 

B.2.2 CANBERRA THEATRE CENTRE

What we are : the Canberra region’s main theatre centre, incorporating the Canberra Theatre, The Playhouse and the Courtyard Studio

What we do : we connect people with theatre experiences of national and international quality

Our vision : to be a leading theatre centre in Australasia and Asia

Customers Audiences that are growing, diverse, engaged and entertained

Strategies to achieve this :

>        Ensure our customers are the focus of all our activities.

>        Provide public programs to enhance the onstage experience.

>        Target initiatives to address special needs in the community.

>        Develop young patrons, to ensure a future audience.

>        Increase audiences, including from the region.

Actions

Results

Continually seek to improve customer/patron satisfaction with their visit to, and experience of, the Centre’s venues and presentations, including by surveying audiences and using information gained to improve facilities and services.

The post-performance surveys conducted on the Centre’s 41 subscription and general hire show seasons indicated a 95% approval rate with patrons.  Attendance data showed a 5% increase in patrons from the previous year.

Assist patrons to access the Centre during the construction phase of the Constitution Place development, including through additional information provision, signage and concierge services.

Information about the construction of Constitution Place was included in the 2018 Collected Works season brochure.  The Centre’s website was regularly updated with information relating to access and parking.   Parking changes and alternative parking options were detailed in pre-show emails to ticket purchasers.

Provide public programs and value-adding opportunities that enhance the overall patron experience.

In 2017–18, the Centre’s programming included an active calendar of public programs.  Pre-show In Conversations were arranged for Bennelong, Landscape with Monsters and The Beginning of Nature, and post-show Q&As were held for 1984, The Wharf Revue, The Popular Mechanicals, A Pacifist’s Guide to the War On Cancer, and Black is the New White. The Aspirations of Daise Morrow, The Bleeding Tree and Sense & Sensibility included pre- and post-show discussion.  The Centre also hosted a well-attended forum associated with A Pacifist’s Guide to the War On Cancer.

 

The Museum of Australian Democracy satellite exhibition of Behind the Lines, which was held in the Link Foyer, accompanied the season of The Wharf Review and attracted a total attendance of 7,344.

 

The Centre provided education programs associated with This Poisoned Sea, Mr Stink and A Town Called War Boy, and children’s activities were held in the Link Foyer for Mr Stink, The Very Hungry Caterpillar, Prehistoric Aquarium, Room on the Broom, The 78-Storey Treehouse and The Gruffalo. A successful Student Meet & Greet was held for audience members to meet members of the Flying Fruit Fly Circus performance of Junk.

The Centre was responsible for the recruitment and participation of 25 local volunteers in Intimate Spectacles’ Oedipus Schmoedipus.

 

School students from the ACT and surrounding region were offered significantly subsidised ticket prices to access schools matinee and selected evening performances across the season.

 

Secondary schools and colleges were able to access free tickets for Sense & Sensibility.

Implement the Access Action Plan for the Centre in order to enhance its accessibility for people with disabilities.

Implementation of the Access Action Plan continued during the year.  For example, it provided the basis for a successful bid for capital works funding in the 2018–19 Budget, which was announced in June 2018, for the installation of ambulatory toilet cubicles throughout the Centre, the upgrading of captioning equipment, and the provision of wheelchair access to the mid-level of the Canberra Theatre auditorium.

 

Access initiatives throughout 2017–18 included tactile tours, audio descriptions and captioned performances for 13 of the Centre’s shows. Audio loops and Companion Cards are available for all productions presented at the Centre.  Relaxed performances of The Very Hungry Caterpillar were offered for young people with sensory challenges.

 

During the year, the Centre’s marketing team continued to promote access facilities through all marketing channels, including a large print brochure and a specific access flyer.

Continue to deliver inclusive community programs.

The Canberra Labor Club continued as Community Sponsor of the Centre throughout the year.

 

The Centre’s Social Capital program distributed 620 tickets to the value of $18,762.20 to the following charities and organisations :  

·         St Vincent de Paul Society

·         Barnardos

·         Macquarie and Macgregor primary schools

·         Project O

·         University of Canberra

·         Alzheimer’s Australia ACT

·         Warehouse Circus

·         Marymead

·         Carers ACT

·         Rise Above

·         Offbeat

·         Leukaemia Foundation

·         The Clemente Canberra Program  

·         National Centre for Indigenous Studies, ANU

·         CanTeen

·         CREATE Foundation

·         The War Widows Guild of Australia

·         Legacy

·         Saint Francis Xavier College

·         St John Paul College

·         Canberra Girls Grammar

·         Campbell High

·         Salvation Army


The 10 Music at Midday concerts held in 2017–18 raised a total of
$8,798 for the following local organisations and national charities with a local presence :

·         Radio 1RPH

·         ACT Rescue & Foster

·         Rise Above The Cancer Support Group

·         Bosom Buddies ACT Inc

·         Hartley Lifecare Inc

 

ProgrammingA diverse, high quality, entertaining and distinctive program

Strategies to achieve this :

>        Program high quality, innovative shows that engage and entertain, and which include international companies and performers, digital programs, and connections to the Asian market.

>        Ensure the range of genres presented at the Centre is appropriate for the venues, the marketplace and the supply of product.

>        Provide culturally diverse shows as a part of regular programming, including shows featuring Indigenous cultures.

>        Program to complement existing festivals and foster new festivals.

>        Develop and extend programming for new audiences, with a particular focus on young people.

>        Support local performing artists.

>        Support producers that take the financial risk at the Centre.

>        Attract large-scale shows to Canberra on a regular basis, including opportunities for exclusive Canberra seasons.

Actions

Results

Ensure a successful Canberra season of the major musical MAMMA MIA!, to demonstrate the demand for further large-scale touring shows to Canberra.

The Centre hosted the opening season of the national tour of MAMMA MIA!.  This was the highest grossing musical in Canberra history, with a total audience of 32,595.  As a consequence of the Centre’s success in staging MAMMA MIA!, a second major musical season has been secured.

Encourage major performing arts seasons for Canberra by keeping networks alive and accessing funding to mitigate risk and attract major events.

The Centre’s Program Manager maintains regular contact with national performing arts centres and key arts organisations.  The Music and Major Events Programmer is in contact with concert promoters, agents and producers.

Program and deliver subscription seasons, to bring leading, emerging and independent performing arts companies to Canberra and develop a strong ‘artistic footprint’ for the Centre.

Title: MAMMA MIA! performed at the Centre - Description: MAMMA MIA! performed at the Centre

MAMMA MIA! performed at the Centre

The 2017 Subscription Season –  Collected Works 2017 – presented a season of productions involving classic, contemporary and musical theatre, comedy, dance and circus including 1984, Bennelong, The Wharf Revue, The Popular Mechanicals, Blue Love, Landscape with Monsters, The Merchant of Venice and MAMMA MIA!

 

The Centre’s 2018 Subscription Season is similarly varied.  Launched on 16 October 2017, it comprises 19 core shows from national and international companies such as Kings Head Theatre and Complicité Associates (London); Sydney Theatre Company, Bell Shakespeare and One Eyed Man Productions (Sydney); Australian Dance Theatre (Adelaide); Pigeonhole Theatre (Canberra); Opera Australia; The Farm (Gold Coast); and Tasmania Performs.

Highlights of the 2018 Subscription Season that have been performed thus far include : Black is the New White; Antony & Cleopatra; The Bleeding Tree; The Aspirations of Daise Morrow; Sense & Sensibility; and The Beginning of Nature.

As of 30 June 2018, the Centre had 2,230 subscribers for its 2018 season, and had sold 15,110 tickets to subscribers to Collected Works 2018 productions.

 

The active Family and Education Program provided many exciting theatrical experiences for younger audiences and their carers, including adaptations of popular fiction such as Mr Stink and The 78-Storey Treehouse, the Australian Theatre For Young People’s drama A Town Named War Boy, and the Flying Fruit Fly Circus adventure Junk.

Program performances and productions to keep the venue and forecourt active, and to increase the range of performing arts available to the Canberra community.

The Centre and promoter Strut & Fret co-presented a 2018 season of the Spiegeltent, staged in Civic Square, which showcased a variety of shows including comedy, contemporary music, circus and burlesque.  The Centre also worked with the organisers of local festivals and events, such as the National Multicultural Festival 2018, Diwali, Moon Cake Festival and the Canberra Comedy Festival, to bring a variety of events to Civic Square.  Collaboration with the City Renewal Authority was central to planning for these activities.

 

Working with Reconciliation Australia, the Centre presented the inaugural Reconciliation Day Eve concert, which featured Archie Roach, Tiddas and Briggs amongst others.  The national launch event for Reconciliation Week was hosted at the Centre.

Support existing and develop new relationships with audiences and presenters, to expand their use of the Centre’s venues and services, and to increase the supply of product, including shows featuring Indigenous cultures, other culturally diverse shows, and shows targeted towards young audiences.

The Centre’s focus on internationally and nationally significant live music, comedy and talking-head events resulted in a diverse program of offerings. Highlights include performances by the bands Veruca Salt, Hoodoo Gurus and Regurgitator; singers Clare Bowditch and Jose Gonzalez; and the health commentator Michael Mosley.  The Centre’s support for the concerts associated with the National Multicultural Festival 2018 and Reconciliation Day Eve gave a culturally diverse focus to its programming.

 

The successful program of children’s works staged throughout the year was promoted by ongoing relationships with producers of theatre for younger audiences.  Collaborations took place with CDP Kids and Erth Visual & Physical Inc (Sydney), shake & stir theatre co (Brisbane), Patch Theatre (Adelaide) and Flying Fruit Fly Circus (Albury), targeting younger audiences.

Support local creative development, including through :

supporting events that showcase local talent and local companies

supporting emerging/early career artists in the performing arts

holding master classes, workshops and forums for local practitioners to engage with visiting companies.

The Centre confirmed its commitment to local creative development by providing tangible support to emerging artists and showcasing local events.  Sponsorship support was provided to several locally produced performances including choreographer James Batchelor’s Deepspace and Proscenium, musician Mikelangelo’s Heart-Shaped Shadow, and Crimson Rosella’s Dead Horse Gap.  Support provided to the Canberra Youth Theatre contributed to their successful tour of the play Verbatim to Sydney.  Further afield, support to Pigeonhole Theatre facilitated its tour of Playhouse Creatures to Monaco.

 

The Opening Support Acts program supported local musicians to tour with more established performers, such as Music by H with Jose Gonzalez, The Lowlands with Beth Orton, Brass Knuckle Brass Band with John Cleary and Laura Ingram with Clare Bowditch.

Participate in industry organisations such as Live Performance Australia, Performing Arts Connections Australia (formerly the Australian Performing Arts Centres Association), and the Association of Asia Pacific Performing Arts Centres.

Opportunities to participate in local, regional and national industry organisations were a productive aspect of the year’s activities.  Senior managers attended two international conferences: the Global Cultural Districts Network conference in Dubai and the Venue Management Association conference in Auckland.

 

Taking on active roles in the management of industry organisations was valuable in maintaining and extending the Centre’s relationships.  These roles included the Centre Director’s position as an Executive Council member for Live Performance Australia (until December 2017) and the Association of Asia Pacific Performing Arts Centres. The Director also served as a board member of the regional arts development organisation, South East Arts. The Centre’s Program Manager is Deputy Chair of the Theatre Panel, Helpmann Awards, sits on the Regional Touring panel, and also attended meetings of the OZPAC group.

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

BusinessVenues, systems and people that support high quality live performances

Strategies to achieve this :

>        Maintain the Centre’s venues and facilities to industry standards through the Asset Management Plan.

>        Ensure all business areas are resourced, including staffing, for current and future levels of activity.

>        Ensure marketing operations maximise ticket sales and support brand identity.

>        Ensure Canberra Ticketing maximises ticket sales and seeks entrepreneurial ticketing opportunities.

>        Ensure front-of-house operations create a high quality customer experience and maximise financial returns.

>        Ensure technical operations support high quality theatre experiences.

>        Increase Theatre Reserve through the Centre’s commercial activities.

>        Use business metrics as a basis for future growth.

Actions

Results

Undertake the final year of a three-year Stage 3 upgrade program for the Centre, to retain the Centre’s functionality and status as a professional performing arts centre, with improvements to patron and performer amenities.

A number of improvements were made to support the Centre’s status as a professional performing arts centre.  Upgrades to safety and amenity included the installation of safety fencing on the Link Roof Walkway, double-glazing of the administration offices and the Courtyard Studio, and improvements to the internal communications network and fire safety systems.

Undertake a program of other upgrades and improvements using infrastructure upgrade funding, and through internally-funded projects, where funds are available. Explore scope to improve the amenity, functionality and acoustic quality of the theatre foyer areas to complement the precinct, improve the patron experience and encourage a longer stay in the venue. Improve infrastructure to facilitate access initiatives. Assess the need for further physical security measures.

Capital upgrade funding for the year allowed improvements to audio and communications equipment.  Planning and specifications were prepared for further security measures and improvements to the Centre’s foyer areas.

Review staffing levels and structure and adjust these as necessary to ensure they address current volumes of activity.

An independent review of the Centre’s senior management structure was undertaken during the year, enabling adjustments to be made to address current program priorities.

Develop e-business through web-based marketing and undertake research to assess audience attendance patterns.

The Centre has established a thriving web-based marketing system, the basis of which is weekly electronic direct mail to announce new shows and those currently on sale.  Ongoing campaigns were carried on the Google Display Ads and AdWords platforms, and social media was used effectively through investment in boosting posts and the creation of Facebook Events.  The Centre worked closely with other local organisations, such as Dendy Cinemas and Canberra Mums, to tap into their social media followers. 

 

Audience and attendance patterns were reviewed with the aim of establishing audience insights into demographic, purchasing patterns and attendance levels.  These insights were enhanced by post-show surveying, which in 2017–18 focused on economic impact.

Maintain and develop Box Office services to address business and customer needs, including through using the Customer Relationship Management System embedded in Canberra Ticketing’s ticketing system.

The Centre provided ticketing services to external venues including Parliament House and the Belconnen Arts Centre.

 

The Centre continued to address the problem of secondary-market ticket sales and implemented several measures to address the impact of scalping.  These included identifying purchasing anomalies, connecting with reselling sites and removing e-ticket facilities where possible, and informing patrons of the risks of purchasing tickets outside official channels.

Ensure Front of House business operations and customer services are kept at a high standard, including through use of Point of Sale technology and upgraded bar facilities. Analyse Front of House data and act on this, both to increase commercial returns and to improve the patron experience.

The Front of House activities of the Centre continued to be critical to its business success and professional reputation.  As such, the past year saw a focus on safety and security, with emergency evacuation training being provided to staff and the use of portable radio units to improve staff communications.

 

The Centre used electronic screens in the foyer areas to promote and market events and products.

Build the Theatre Reserve through commercial operations.

An updated Theatre Reserve Policy was endorsed by the CFC Board in June 2018.

 

Due to the extension of theatre programming into new areas of performance such as contemporary music, there was no further increase to the Theatre Reserve.  No call was made on the Reserve during the year and this stands at $1.1 million.

 

LeadershipAn integral part of the cultural life of the Canberra region and beyond

Strategies to achieve this :

>        Maintain a distinctive, clear and consistent brand for the Centre.

>        Provide leadership in theatre education, including programs that link to the Australian curriculum, and vocational education and training (VET) programs in technical skills.

>        Research and promote the importance of the Centre as a key driver of business activity in the city centre and a key contributor to the economy of the Canberra region.

>        Develop a major new theatre appropriate for the nation’s capital.

Actions

Results

Use the Centre’s venue branding to promote the productions presented at the venue as being of a consistently high and reliable quality, and to support venue hirers in marketing their product. Ensure all connections with the Centre’s brand are authentic. Maintain brand presence including through social media and digital marketing.

Strategic placement of the Centre’s branding on high-quality productions that appeal to target audiences was an effective promotional program during the year.

 

The focus on increasing contemporary music events at the Centre was supported by the assigning of a dedicated marketing team member to promote these opportunities regionally.

 

The Centre’s database was extended by its social media presence which connects with 21,000+ Facebook followers, 3,600+ Instagram followers and 4,900+ Twitter followers.

Further develop and implement a Creative Learning Policy for the Centre and resource the Centre’s education department to maintain and grow links with schools, provide work experience opportunities, implement the Centre’s Vocational Education and Training in theatre technical skills and establish a regional leadership role in this field.

The renaming of the Education team in 2018 to Discovery and Learning effectively captured the breadth of the Centre’s family and schools programming.  As of 30 June 2018, the Centre welcomed 14,997 students and 1,690 teachers from 173 schools for its 2017–18 Discovery and Learning program which included 332 workshops, 49 student participatory performances and 29 season performances. The presentation of high quality productions, including Mr Stink, The Very Hungry Caterpillar, The Merchant of Venice, Junk and A Town Called War Boy confirmed the Centre’s status as a preferred venue for education through performance with 11,637 students and 1,098 teachers attending 29 performances.

 

26 work experience students from 14 schools were hosted during the year, resulting in consistently positive feedback from students and schools.  The Centre also continued its partnership with the University of Canberra to work with preservice primary teachers in developing a cross-curricular program of learning based on the live theatre experience.  The partnership with the University of Canberra also worked towards the development of a cross-curricular Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics theatre program.

 

In-venue backstage tours continued to be popular with schools particularly responding to the hands on experience.  Eight tours were conducted for 142 students and 13 teachers from seven schools.

 

In partnership with local organisations, such as ACT Libraries, the Come Alive Festival and Big hART’s Project O, the Centre engaged with the local community in events such as interactive story times, attracting 461 children and 219 parents, a Museum Festival for Young People engaging 300 students from 20 schools, and a ‘colourathon’ at the National Gallery of Australia.

149 teachers participated in 16 professional learning workshops and 1,836 students participated in a total of 332 workshops across the year.  Highlights include, Bangarra Dance Theatre and Primary Drama Pedagogy workshops.

The Centre hosted the Drama Australia Symposium in partnership with Drama Australia and the ACT Drama Association (ACTDA) and welcomed 99 Drama teachers from across the country.  The relationship with ACTDA was strengthened by the group’s regular meetings at the Centre.

Foster performing arts skills development through such means as presenting Acting Up! a festival of
10-minute plays by young people.

The Act Up! Student Fringe Festival in June 2018, which evolved from the Acting Up! festival of 10-minute plays, incorporated a range of performance types including theatre, dance, live music, comedy and digital media.  The festival presented 49 performances across four venues, engaging 330 students and 36 teachers from 22 local and regional high schools and colleges.  

Continue to analyse the economic impact for the ACT of the Centre’s activities, including through regional visitation, and assess how theatre activity can both support, and be supported by, businesses such as cafes and restaurants in the precinct.

The Centre used surveys to establish the venue’s economic impact on Canberra and the region.

 

Further information is provided in the Centre’s numbers at a glance section.

In conjunction with other ACT agencies, undertake community consultation into new theatre needs, as a basis for developing a comprehensive business case to put to Government.

Senior staff of the Centre worked closely with colleagues from ACT Treasury and artsACT throughout the year in further identifying the business and community needs for a new theatre.

 

The Canberra Theatre Centre Advisory Committee contributed to this work, by advising on theatre education needs in a new venue.

 


CMAG at a glance


QUALITY OF SERVICE

Clapping Hands94.8%

approval rating


1,723
OBJECTS ON DISPLAY

PROGRAMS
213
learning programs delivered for CMAG and the Nolan Collection


19 EXHIBITIONS


Ribbon

HIGHLY COMMENDED
for The Art Box
Nolan Collection
Learning Resource
in the

MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES NATIONAL AWARDS 2018


Meeting

VENUE HIRE
2,600
people attended private events at CMAG

 

Dance

2,746
visitors to the National Multicultural Festival Children’s Sanctuary at CMAG

 


VISITORS

65,000*

433 OBJECTS

added to the CMAG Collection

50 SCHOOLS & UNIVERSITIESHead with Gears

accessed CMAG’s programs – many multiple times

*includes visitors to touring exhibitions                                                       

 

B.2.3 CANBERRA MUSEUM AND GALLERY

What we are : A museum and gallery dedicated to the visual arts and social history of the Canberra regio

What we do : We connect people with the Canberra region’s rich and diverse stories, sense of place, and contemporary identity

Our vision : To be a leading regional cultural venue in Australia and beyond

Customers – Audiences that are growing, diverse, engaged and entertained

Strategies to achieve this :

>        Ensure our customers are the focus of all our activities.

>        Target initiatives to address special needs and interests in the community, extend the demographic of our customers, and reach out to those who do not currently access our services.

>        Review visitor surveys and data to enable greater responsiveness in services and programming.

Actions

Results

Continually seek to improve customer satisfaction with their visit to, and experience of, CMAG.

Throughout the year, CMAG focused on providing high-quality experiences for its customers, resulting in a 94.8% approval rate, based on visitor surveying. 

Implement and monitor the success of enhancements to existing surveys, and proactively use information gained from surveys and online comments, to improve facilities and services.

The CMAG visitor survey was updated for 2017–18 to include more detailed and specific questions providing for greater insight into visitor motivations.  CMAG’s intensive one-on-one surveying during 2017–18 enabled a sampling of the full range of visitors who use CMAG’s facilities.

 

CMAG regularly monitored feedback provided via customer surveys, TripAdvisor and Facebook and responded promptly to suggestions, which led to a number of improvements in exhibition presentation and wayfinding.

Participate in VisitCanberra tourism initiatives and encourage Front of House staff to complete the Customer Service Champions program.

CMAG’s Front of House team have participated in CBR Customer Service Champion training.

 

Familiarisation sessions for major exhibitions at CMAG were regularly conducted for VisitCanberra staff.  In June 2018, VisitCanberra staff also held their monthly meeting at CMAG during which the Director and Marketing Coordinator gave attendees a tour of the Nolan Collection Gallery and the Canberra Stories Gallery.

 

CMAG provides VisitCanberra with promotional images for use on digital screens in the Canberra and Region Visitors Centre.  CMAG also features in VisitCanberra’s See Canberra publication, and supplies exhibition and visitor information to the Australian Tourism Data Warehouse, which is used by various tourism bodies, including VisitCanberra, to provide tourism advice to the public.

Complete and implement the Access Action Plan for CMAG, in order to enhance its accessibility for people with disabilities.

Progress was made in implementing access improvements identified in the Access Action Plan, including upgrades to gallery lighting to avoid glare and to the front of house administration office; utilisation of subtitled text in some audio visual displays; and use of Australian Sign Language (Auslan) in selected exhibitions and floor talks.

Incorporate enhanced digital experiences in the majority of CMAG exhibitions.

Links to video material and an online catalogue provided enhanced digital experiences associated with exhibitions Celebration : 20 years of collecting visual art at CMAG, Canberra Stories and Unfinished Business, and the Nolan Foundation Collection.

Continue to implement CMAG’s digital strategy, including digital communications and marketing opportunities, develop a social media strategy and marketing strategy.

Dedicated screens were used in the CMAG foyer to display relevant local social media feeds and ArchivesACT ‘Find of the Month’.  CMAG presented the online program #take20yearsatCMAG to highlight connections between pairs of artworks in the exhibition Celebration : 20 years of collecting visual art at CMAG.  Weekly posts encouraged visitors to consider other connections between works in the exhibition and share via social media.

Digital video works of arts were displayed as part of the exhibition Celebration : 20 years of collecting visual art at CMAG and acquired during the year.

 

An 11.5% increase in Facebook likes was recorded on the CMAG page over 2017–18This increase was supported by the use of targeted Facebook advertising for CMAG’s programs.

 

Scrolling text, audio description, ASL and Auslan were made available via personal devices to provide enhanced access to the exhibition Unfinished Business.

 

CMAG recorded audio from gallery floor talks and posted these programs on the CMAG website, including the NAIDOC week floor talk with Ngambri–Ngunnawal elder and artist Matilda House.

 

Programming Exhibitions and programs that reflect Canberra’s unique identity

Strategies to achieve this :

>        Program high quality, innovative exhibitions, education and community programs and other activities, using digital applications to enhance programs and systems.

>        Ensure cultural diversity is part of regular programming, including exhibitions and programs featuring Indigenous cultures.

>        Develop and extend programming for young audiences.

>        Provide programs that complement, but make a point of difference with, the national cultural institutions, highlighting CMAG’s unique focus on the Canberra region including by featuring regional artists.

Actions

Results

Present an exhibition program that reflects the diversity of the Canberra community and its interests, including through collaborations and partnerships with the community. Provide new opportunities for access to the CMAG Collection, including aspects that connect with Indigenous narratives.

CMAG presented an engaging program of exhibitions during the year, reflecting community interests and creating enjoyment for its diverse audiences, with highlights as follows.

·         The exhibition Eirene Mort : A Livelihood displayed works from the CMAG collection and works on loan from the Mort family and other local, interstate and national collecting institutions.

·         The exhibition Crossing threads: 50 years of the Canberra Spinners and Weavers was presented in partnership with Canberra Spinners and Weavers and supported by ACT Government arts project funding via artsACT.

·         Martin Rowney’s eponymous exhibition of sculptural assemblage was supported in conjunction with the ANU School of Art Emerging Artist Support Scheme.

·         CMAG partnered with Canberra Arts Patrons’ Organisation (CAPO) to present the CAPO Cocktail preview, exhibition and auction in 2017.

Tour Peace, Love and World War : The Denman’s Empire and Australia 1910–1917 to the UK.

 

 

 

The 2016 exhibition Peace, Love and World War : The Denman’s Empire and Australia 1910–1917 toured to King’s College, London, UK from 3 July to 25 September 2017, where it was opened by the then Australian High Commissioner to the United Kingdom,
the Hon Alexander Downer AC.

Title: Launch of the exhibition Peace, Love and World War : The Denman’s Empire and Australia 1910–1917 King’s College, London, UK - Description: Launch of the exhibition Peace, Love and World War : The Denman’s Empire and Australia 1910–1917 King’s College, London, UK

Launch of the exhibition Peace, Love and World War : The Denman’s Empire and Australia 1910–1917 King’s College, London, UK

Present the Nolan Foundation Collection on an ongoing basis, together with elements of the broader Nolan Collection.

The Nolan Foundation Collection was on display throughout 2017–18 except for a short period for conservation assessment of the collection.

Present a comprehensive range of community and education programs and other activities at CMAG that reflect and recognise the diversity of the Canberra community and which :

·         reinforce CMAG’s role as a leading regional museum and gallery; a key city centre destination; and a place for exploring ideas about our region’s future;

·         complement the exhibition program;

·         recognise special events and festivals celebrated by the Canberra community;

·         feature Indigenous cultures;

·         use digital media to enhance and extend the experience;

·         connect with the education sector, including through outreach activities, and with close links to the curriculum and to teacher quality accreditation; and

·         are provided through collaborations and partnerships with the community and other institutions.

Title: Items from the exhibition Tiki Takeover - Description: Items from the exhibition Tiki Takeover

Items from the exhibition Tiki Takeover

  

 

Title: CMAG on Sunday program Peel back paint - Description: CMAGSundayPeelBackPaint3

CMAG on Sunday program Peel back paint

 

 

Title: Exhibition Eirene Mort : A Livelihood - Description: IreneMortCMAGexhibition

Exhibition Eirene Mort : A Livelihood

CMAG’s 175 community and education programs during 2017–18 complemented the exhibition program and included floor talks by curators and artists, adult workshops, family and toddler studio workshops, lectures and panel events, film screenings, and education programs for students from early primary through to secondary level. Examples include :

·         a site visit to Gungahlin Homestead and a printmaking workshop, Intaglio, which also drew links to the Nolan Collection, in association with the exhibition Eirene Mort : A Livelihood;

·         toddler and children’s art workshops and a collection store tour in association with the exhibition Celebration : 20 years of collecting visual art at CMAG;

·         a children’s weaving workshop led by a local textile artist in association with Crossing threads;

·         collector floor talks in association with exhibitions in the Open Collection gallery, such as Pulp Fiction and Tiki Takeover;

·         artist talks in association with installations in Gallery 4; and

·         CMAG on Sunday workshops that drew on a different exhibition each month for inspiration, ranging from major exhibitions to smaller scale exhibitions in the ramp showcase.

 

In recognition of special events and festivals, CMAG presented :

·         children’s activities at the CMAG on Sunday Book Week Special in August 2017;

·         a lecture on women in design, inspired by the exhibition Eirene Mort : A Livelihood, as part of the Design Canberra Festival in November 2017;

·         a range of self-directed activity tables across a two-week school holiday period, which were inspired by both the Floriade festival in September/October 2017 and the exhibition Eirene Mort : A Livelihood;

·         the Children’s Sanctuary, in partnership with Child and Family Services, Civic Library and ACT Community Language Schools Association, to present a range of cultural activities across the weekend of the National Multicultural Festival in February 2018.  Over 2,700 visitors attended, including many first time visitors to CMAG;

·         a series of ‘social yarns’ about Lake Burley Griffin, Lakeside Stories, in celebration of Canberra Day in March 2018;

·         a series of talks and clinics in collaboration with the Australian Institute for the Conservation of Cultural Material on ‘preserving your stories’, in celebration of the Canberra and Region Heritage Festival in April 2018;

·         a talk by the Director on future directions for CMAG, to coincide with International Museums Day in May 2018;

·         in celebration of NAIDOC week in July 2017, CMAG presented a talk by Matilda House discussing her works on display in the Canberra Stories Gallery: Murrumbeja dooligah (1996) and a possum-skin cloak;

·         as a part of the inaugural ACT Reconciliation Day celebrations in May 2018, CMAG presented an itinerary of ‘six things to see at CMAG on Reconciliation Day 2018’; and

·         in partnership with the University of Canberra-based Australian National Museum of Education, CMAG displayed material relevant to the 2018 Canberra and Region Heritage Festival.

 

Digital media was used to enhance and extend audience and participant experiences in diverse ways, including :

·         digital collages of the prints created by participants in Intaglio were posted to an online exhibition;

·         education kits associated with current and past education programs were made available for teachers to access online; and

·         online slideshows were posted on the CMAG website to present an overview of programs or the work created during regular programs.

 

CMAG presented programs and outreach activities that connected with the education sector, with close links to the curriculum and to teacher quality accreditation.  What Do Artists Make? was delivered to early childhood school groups within the gallery spaces and studio. The program’s pre-visit information packs outline its links to the ACT Curriculum framework.

 

CMAG collaborated with the Friends of the National Film and Sound Archive to present a number of film screenings with links to exhibitions. In partnership with Soldier On, an organisation that offers services for returned soldiers, CMAG presented a site visit to Gungahlin Homestead in February 2018 that drew connections to the Eirene Mort : A Livelihood exhibition.

Present education and community programs relating to the Nolan Collection, to enrich the understanding and enjoyment of visitors and participants in outreach programs, including a new program linking the Nolan Collection to CMAG’s visual art collection.

 

CMAG presented 38 community and education programs in association with the Nolan Collection in 2017–18.  The education program Every Picture Tells a Story is delivered to early childhood school groups in the gallery and studio spaces.  An outreach version of this program was also delivered in the classroom setting.

 

CMAG’s outreach program, The Art Box, was highly commended in the Interpretation, Learning & Audience Engagement category of the 2018 Museums Galleries Awards presented in Melbourne in June 2018.  This lower primary visual arts learning resource features paintings in the Nolan Collection and encourages students to make connections between these paintings and works by other artists in the CMAG Collection.

 

New Teacher Quality Institute (TQI) accredited professional learning workshops were developed in association with the Nolan Collection. Unpacking The Art Box was launched at the ANU’s Arts Up Front conference in February 2018 and was delivered to teachers from a local school in May 2018. Starting Stop Motion Nolan was re-accredited by TQI and delivered to teachers from a local school in May 2018.

 

Jennifer Thompson, Collections and Exhibitions Manager at the Bundanon Trust, presented a floor talk on the relationship between Arthur Boyd and Sidney Nolan.

 

Director, Shane Breynard, presented a floor talk introduction to the Nolan Kelly paintings in conjunction with the screening of the film, The Story of The Kelly Gang (1906) at CMAG.

 

Stewardship – Venues and collections that allow us to tell the many stories of Canberra

Strategies to achieve this :

>        Maintain CMAG’s venues and facilities to industry standards.

>        Develop, conserve and research CMAG’s integrated visual arts and social history collection.

>        Digitise CMAG’s collection.

>        Care for the Nolan Collection and enhance its presentation.

Actions

Results

Implement a major upgrade to CMAG’s lighting, to provide state-of-the-art lighting standards and improve energy efficiency, safety and conditions for conservation.

Track lighting throughout CMAG was replaced with LED lighting to coincide with opening of the exhibition Celebration : 20 years of collecting visual art at CMAG on 23 March 2018.

Undertake infrastructure upgrades at CMAG, including upgrades to signage, gallery spaces, exhibition furniture, collection management software, front reception desk and cafe.

Infrastructure and major equipment upgrades included enhancements to security, updating of signage, new exhibition furniture and remote temperature and humidity logging for exhibition spaces, a new audio system for the foyer, and the installation of a defibrillator unit for public areas.

Develop, conserve, research and interpret an integrated social history and visual arts collection at CMAG, including by focusing on collection management activities, procedures and resources, and implementing and updating relevant policies, such as CMAG’s Collection Development Strategy.

CMAG continued to care for and develop collections under its stewardship, including through a program of acquisitions to the CMAG Collection featuring a number of donations, such as significant works by senior regional artists Hiroe Swen, Ninon Geier and
Fay Skyring.  The major purchases and donations to the CMAG Collection that were secured in 2017–18 included works in identified areas of growth such as textiles, glass and digital art.

 

The CMAG Collection Policy and Collection Management Procedures Manual were updated, to be finalised in 2018–19.

Conserve, research, interpret and manage the Nolan Collection, in accordance with the Nolan Management Agreement with the Commonwealth. Collaborate with relevant agencies, with the aim of bringing works from the Nolan Collection to a wider audience, including through loaning works to major exhibitions and making images available online for publications and programs.

Detailed condition assessments were undertaken with regard to key paintings in the Nolan Collection and LED lighting was installed in the Nolan Gallery to provide improved viewing and conservation conditions for the Nolan Foundation Collection.

 

Filming took place at CMAG for a joint ABC and BBC documentary on the life and work of Sir Sidney Nolan entitled Nolan: The Man and The Myth.

Progress digitisation of the CMAG collection.

The 168 works of art included in exhibition Celebration : 20 years of collecting visual art at CMAG were photographed and will be available to view through CMAG’s online collection access facility in 2018–19.

 

Leadership – An integral part of the cultural life of the Canberra region and beyond

Strategies to achieve this :

>        Enhance and extend CMAG’s presence and profile in North Building, to provide greater visibility on Civic Square and London Circuit; more spaces to deliver a greater range of exhibitions and activities; a dedicated family and children’s space; a retail space; a larger café facility; improved venue hire areas, including a large foyer space and a rooftop terrace; and a city centre hub for visitor information.

>        Promote the role of CMAG as a major visitor attraction, information hub and happening place in the city centre of Canberra, and as a venue of regional importance.

>        Pursue productive partnerships with other cultural organisations, Canberra region artists, and the wider community in developing and delivering our programs.

Actions

Results

Progress plans to redesign/expand the CMAG foyer and revitalise the ground floor area and street frontages.

Plans to reconfigure areas of CMAG’s ground floor were further progressed and will be considered as funds become available. 

Celebrate 20 years of collecting visual art at CMAG in 2018.

A celebratory opening and a separate patrons’ preview event were held in conjunction with the exhibition Celebration : 20 years of collecting visual art at CMAG.  Numerous radio and print interviews and tours were provided in conjunction with the exhibition as well as a tour for Canberra Region Visitor Information Centre staff. A comprehensive program of public floor talks and events was delivered in association with the exhibition.

Promote venue hire business at CMAG, balanced with the core functions of this site, and develop opportunities to increase income from activities such as the CMAG cafe.

Venue hire of CMAG facilities continues to flourish and exceeded budget.

 

A restructure of café staffing was trialled to enhance customer service.

 

Café catering of on-site events has been piloted and will be further explored in 2018–19.

Increase awareness of CMAG in local, regional, national and international markets.

CMAG was a sponsor of the June Museums Galleries Australia 2018 conference held in Melbourne, at which the Director of CMAG presented two papers.

 

The Director also attended the Australia–Singapore Cultural Leaders’ Forum in Adelaide in September 2017 where opportunities were explored for potential museum and gallery exchanges with Singapore institutions.

Continue existing and develop new partnerships between CMAG and other relevant organisations/institutions, including partnerships with : You Are Here festival; Capital Arts Patrons Organisation; School of Art at the Australian National University; and national cultural institutions and relevant agencies of Australian and ACT governments.

CMAG undertook exhibition partnerships with Heide Museum of Modern Art, Melbourne; the National Art School, Sydney; and with the Capital Arts Patrons’ Organisation.

 

CMAG partnered with the City Renewal Authority and the Play Activation Network ACT to present the ‘Play, Creativity and Culture’ symposium in November 2017, and with Child and Family Services, Civic Library and ACT Community Language Schools Association to present the Children’s Sanctuary at the National Multicultural Festival  in February 2018.  A series of talks and clinics in celebration of the Canberra and Region Heritage Festival in April 2018 were presented in partnership with the Australian Institute for the Conservation of Cultural Material.

 

CMAG partnered with Red Cross Australia ACT to launch the 2018 ACT Schools Reconciliation Challenge and to publicly display and celebrate the Reconciliation Day Community Canvas.

 

New partnerships were formed with St Mark’s National Theological Centre, to present a special talk on the life and work of ecclesiastical architect Alberto Dias Soares, and with Parliament House through the development of the exhibition Crafting the house on the hill: art, design and the building of Australian Parliament House, which will be presented in 2018–19.

 

Title: Children enjoying traditional basket weaving at the Children’s Sanctuary, National Multicultural Festival at CMAG - Description: Children enjoying traditional basket weaving at the Children’s Sanctuary, National Multicultural Festival at CMAG
Children enjoying traditional basket weaving at the Children’s Sanctuary, National Multicultural Festival at CMAG

Title: Children’s Sanctuary, National Multicultural Festival at CMAG - Description: Children’s Sanctuary, National Multicultural Festival at CMAG     Title: Children’s Sanctuary, National Multicultural Festival at CMAG - Description: Children’s Sanctuary, National Multicultural Festival at CMAG
Children’s Sanctuary, National Multicultural Festival at CMAG

 


act HISTORIC PLACES AT A GLANCE

VISITORS

63,000


Up 14% from last year

TOURISM

4.5 stars

 
Lanyon Homestead average rating on TripAdvisor

 

PUBLIC PROGRAMS

383 education and community programs



SCHOOLS

1,549 primary & high school students engaged


VOLUNTEERS

 
Volunteers
provided 1,380 hours services

 

WEDDINGS AND EVENTS


17

weddings at Lanyon

 

2,344 people attended private events at Historic Places

 

CONSERVATION

12,740 hours of active conservation work

4,800  protective booties & 960 pairs of white gloves laundered

600 collection Items accessioned at Calthorpes’ House


GARDENS
82.4kg  largest giant pumpkin grown in the Lanyon garden
 43 baby Bunya pines propagated from the ones planted by Andrew Cunningham in 1890  

 

1,500 plants propagated and sold from Lanyon Homestead garden

 

B.2.4 ACT HISTORIC PLACES

What we are : three historic places that reflect different aspects of Canberra’s history: Lanyon Homestead, Calthorpes’ House and Mugga-Mugga

What we do : we connect people with Canberra’s rich and diverse stories and heritage

Our vision : to be leading historic places in Australia and beyond

Customers – Audiences that are growing, diverse, engaged and entertained

Strategies to achieve this :

>        Ensure our customers are the focus of all our activities.

>        Target initiatives to address special needs and interests in the community, extend the demographic of our customers, and reach out to those who do not currently access our services.

>        Review visitor surveys and data to enable greater responsiveness in services and programming.

Actions

Results

Participate in VisitCanberra tourism initiatives and encourage Front of House staff to complete the CBR Customer Service Champion program.

ACT Historic Places staff attended VisitCanberra’s Destination Canberra Conference in February 2018.

 

ACT Historic Places staff were encouraged and supported to undertake customer service training throughout the year.

Use information gained from surveys to improve facilities and services for visitors.

Customer satisfaction surveys were conducted throughout the year and following particular events. Historic Places achieved high levels of customer satisfaction in 2017–18, with 94.9% of visitors surveyed rating their level of visit satisfaction at four or five stars.  Information gained from the surveys was used in planning to improve facilities and services as well as new programs and events.  For example, works were undertaken at Lanyon Homestead and The Barracks Espresso Bar and Eating House to make them more accessible for visitors with restricted mobility.

 

Feedback from customer surveys, TripAdvisor and Facebook was monitored regularly and responded to promptly, leading to a number of improvements in customer service, cafe operations and signage. Lanyon Homestead was listed for the first time in Lonely Planet’s 2017 Australia guidebook, which bases its listings on merit and feedback from visitors.

Work with new partners to help us care for the Historic Places, revitalise the visitor experience, and present them as living cultural landscapes, which appeal to a wider range of people.

The visitor experience and the legacy of Historic Places were enhanced by the formation of new partnerships with local organisations with common interests, including arts groups (Artists Society of Canberra), history organisations (Canberra District Historical Society and ACT Heritage), other historic places (Cuppacumbalong Homestead), environmental groups (Southern ACT Catchment Group) and Indigenous associations (Buru Ngunawal Aboriginal Corporation).

Expand upon Indigenous relationships and opportunities to increase Indigenous interpretation and community involvement.

Historic Places consulted with Buru Ngunawal Aboriginal Corporation and other Aboriginal groups to arrange the removal of graffiti from the Canoe Tree at Lanyon Homestead.  This collaboration led to the establishment of a Scar/Canoe Tree Walk led by Ngunawal Elder and Custodian Wally Bell. An Indigenous walking track in the Lanyon historic precinct is in development

Develop and implement new access action plans for Historic Places, in order to enhance their accessibility for people with disabilities.

Works were undertaken at Lanyon Homestead and The Barracks Espresso Bar and Eating House to make them more accessible for visitors with restricted mobility.

 

Further improvements to access at Lanyon will be achieved through the funding of a people transporter vehicle in the 2018–19 ACT Budget.

Continue to implement the digital strategy for Historic Places, including digital guides to enhance the visitor experience, digital marketing opportunities, and use of social media to provide new engagement opportunities.

Visitor experiences at Mugga-Mugga and Calthorpes’ House were enhanced by the successful introduction of digital guides.  The digital guide for Lanyon is now in the trial stage.

 

Historic Places uses Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and YouTube accounts to market the venues’ unique characteristics, events and programming.  The reach of these channels continued to grow with an 8.79% increase in website users and an increase of 5.5% in Facebook likes, which contributed to Facebook event listings reaching an audience of 55,000 people.

Engage the community through active volunteer programs at the Historic Places.

Historic Places volunteers provided a total of 1,380 hours service across a range of tasks, including collection care, gardening, guiding, and recruitment and training of new volunteers.

 

Nine new volunteers were recruited and trained throughout the year. Two interns from the ANU worked on developing a Cultural Landscape Plan for Mugga-Mugga and the Lanyon Discovery Pack.

Seek Indigenous representation on the Historic Places Advisory Committee.

Rather than appointing an Indigenous representative to the Historic Places Advisory Committee, consultation with the Ngunnawal community was ongoing in 2017–18 and continued to result in additions and improvements to cultural management and programming.

Develop new partnerships across government, community and tertiary sectors to expand programs and services relating to heritage conservation, access and learning.

New partnerships contributed to the Historic Places program throughout the year.  Of particular note was the appointment of Anne-Marie Jean as Artist-in-Residence at Lanyon, where she ran a series of creative arts programs for visitors.  Partnerships with local environmental groups, including ACT Parks and Conservation Service, ACT Wildlife and the Canberra Environment Centre made a substantial contribution to renewing Historic Places commitment to environmental and land management practices at the three sites.

 

Programming – Programs that explore Canberra’s history by interpreting each place

Strategies to achieve this :

>        Program high quality, innovative education and community programs and other activities, using digital applications to enhance programs and systems.

>        Ensure cultural diversity is part of regular programming, including exhibitions and programs featuring Indigenous cultures.

>        Develop and extend programming for young audiences.

>        Provide visitors with additional insights into the historic sites through permanent and temporary exhibitions.

Actions

Results

·         Present a comprehensive range of community and education programs that increase the community’s understanding and enjoyment of the Historic Places and their collections, including ones that :

·         connect with anniversaries, special events and festivals celebrated by the Canberra community;

·         explore Indigenous history and narratives relating to the sites;

·         are targeted at young audiences;

·         use digital media to enhance and extend the experience; and

·         are provided through collaborations with other organisations.

Title: Calthorpes’ House 90th birthday celebrations - Description: Calthorpes’ House 90th birthday celebrations

Calthorpes’ House 90th birthday celebrations

 

Title: Calthorpes' House 90th Birthday - Description: Calthorpes' House 90th Birthday - Maggie Taylor, Claire Smith, Dawn Waterhouse

Maggie Taylor, Claire Smith and
Dawn Waterhouse at Calthorpes’ House

 

Title: Water Wheels program at Mugga-Mugga - Description: MM - Water Wheels program 2

Water Wheels program at Mugga-Mugga

Title: The annual Christmas carols and picnic at Lanyon - Description: The annual Christmas carols and picnic at Lanyon

The annual Christmas carols and picnic at Lanyon

Historic Places presented 383 community and learning programs during the year. Many of these connected with anniversaries, special events and festivals or were provided through collaborations with other organisations.

 

Events associated with the 90th birthday of Calthorpes’ House were received enthusiastically by visitors, including the extended opening hours held in September and October 2017.  A series of celebratory events and activities, including garden tours and cake-decorating, stamping, flower-arranging and pianola music workshops and performances, enlivened the 2017 program.  A formal birthday celebration, held in the gardens at Calthorpes’ House, was attended by over 40 invited guests.

 

Dressing Calthorpes’ House and Lanyon for Christmas has become a widely anticipated tradition, and was held again in 2017.  The annual Christmas carols and picnic at Lanyon, attracted more than 1,600 visitors in 2017, who enjoyed the activities on offer for children and their families.

 

ACT Heritage launched the 2018 Canberra and Region Heritage Festival at Mugga-Mugga.  During the festival, a National Trust Open Day was held at Lanyon and was attended by over 500 people.  Open Houses were held at each site to celebrate special occasions such as Australia Day, ACT Seniors Week, Canberra Day and Mother’s Day.

School holiday workshops throughout the year focused on exploring the sites and buildings.  Discovery Packs, which were introduced at Lanyon and Mugga-Mugga, were a popular vehicle for self-guided children’s activities.

Historic Places collaborated with Nature Play Canberra in its passport program for families and children.  Self-guided activities directly related to Lanyon Homestead were incorporated into the passport.

The Spring Walk and Talk Series presented a range of relevant and engaging talks from local individuals and groups with particular interests aligned with Historic Places.  The Canberra District Historical Society, ACT Parks and Conservation Service and ACT Wildlife, and the Southern ACT Catchment Group presented walks and talks on the history, environment and Indigenous heritage of the three sites.  A highlight of the series was a presentation on collection management by ACT Historic Places Advisory Committee Chair Barbara Reeves and Jennifer Elton, Manager Collections.

 

Events at Lanyon were enlivened throughout the year by musical performances from the Lanyon Trio and Fiddling the Books. These performances were arranged to coincide with open days and the Spring Walk and Talk Series.

 

Lanyon was also host to an Instagram event in association with Instagrammers Canberra.  The sharing on social media of images captured during ‘Instameets’ broadened audience access and awareness of the site.

 

A short documentary film providing a glimpse into the life of the Calthorpe family was produced through collaboration between Historic Places and the Canberra Theatre Centre, and with the generous support of Cultural Facilities Corporation Board Chair
Louise Douglas. Narrated by Dawn Waterhouse, nee Calthorpe, the production is a fine example of history brought to life.

Explore the scope for new programs that encourage repeat visits, such as temporary exhibitions.

Historic Places invested significantly in developing programs aimed at encouraging repeat visits.  Highlights of this endeavour included an exhibition by participants in Art for Communities, an amateur art group exploring art as therapy, and the introduction of a Discovery Farm Walk map as a free resource for visiting families to encourage them to explore Lanyon beyond the homestead and outbuildings.

Present permanent exhibitions at each of the three Historic Places : Lanyon, Calthorpes’ House and Mugga-Mugga, to enrich visitors’ understanding and enjoyment of their visit.

The visitor experience at the three historic sites was enhanced by the display of diverse exhibitions exploring their history and heritage :

·         Lanyon – Within living memory, The Cunningham Family Album, and The Convict Years;

·         Calthorpes’ House – Calthorpes’ House Orientation Exhibition; and

·         Mugga-Mugga – Getting it together.

 

Stewardship – Buildings, grounds and collections that are conserved and researched

Strategies to achieve this :

>        Maintain, conserve and research the buildings, grounds and collections of the Historic Places, within the framework of the Conservation Management Plan for each site.

>        Develop Lanyon’s collection of decorative and fine arts.

>        Digitise the Historic Places collections.

>        Position the heritage-listed gardens of the Historic Places as ‘green collections.’

Actions

Results

Conserve, research, interpret and present the Historic Places and their collections maintaining their cultural significance in accordance with the guidelines of the Burra Charter and the ACT heritage legislation, including by continuing implementation of Conservation Management Plans for each site and implementing the Executive Lease for Lanyon.

The conservation, research, interpretation and management of Historic Places is core business and these activities continued throughout the year.

 

Updated building condition reports for Mugga-Mugga, Calthorpes’ House and Lanyon Homestead were completed and supported the development of a conservation works package that was funded in the 2018–19 ACT Budget.

 

The Lanyon Heritage Centre was used for collection management and as an education centre for school programs.  Collection items were relocated to the Centre following the installation of shelving and heating and cooling.

 

The Lanyon Homestead Bushfire Operations Plan was prepared and approved by the ACT Emergency Services Commissioner and the Bushfire Action Plan was also completed.

 

Security audits were undertaken for the three sites.

Undertake infrastructure upgrades at the Historic Places, including fencing, gardening and workshop equipment, and improvements to the Heritage Centre at Lanyon; Calthorpes’ House conservation works, including works to the air raid shelter and replacement of the rose pergola; and conservation report and follow up works at Mugga-Mugga.

Essential infrastructure works on water and sewerage were undertaken and land management activities associated with rabbit control, weed and fire management, and revegetation/rehabilitation were undertaken at Lanyon and Mugga-Mugga.  Conservation works at Calthorpes’ House involved painting and garden restoration in preparation for the 90th birthday celebrations.

 

Ensure cottages at Lanyon and Mugga-Mugga are rented out, to achieve security and income.

Tenancies of all cottages at Lanyon assisted with security of the site and in generating income.  A new crown lease for Mugga-Mugga was prepared, which makes provision for residential tenancy of the site.

Implement the digital guide project at all Historic Places, allowing consistent high level interpretation of these sites, with the scope in future for translation into different languages and engaging with new audiences.

Interpretation at the three historic sites was supported by the introduction of digital guides at Mugga-Mugga and Calthorpes’ House.  The digital guide for Lanyon is now in the trial stage.

Continue to develop and implement policies and strategies to assist in managing and interpreting the Historic Places collections and sites, including a Historic Places Learning Policy, Collection Management Strategy and Visitor Access Policy.

Work was undertaken during the year to develop a visitor use policy and review the Collection Management Strategy.  An incident action plan was prepared for staff.

Progress detailed recording and mapping of the gardens and grounds of the sites, recognising these form a ‘living collection’ that also needs to be conserved, researched and interpreted.

In recognition of the importance of the heritage landscape beyond the built environment, mapping continued of the living collection that is the gardens and grounds of the three sites in the ACT Historic Places portfolio.

Undertake improvements in work health and safety, and emergency response planning and project management.

New incident response procedures and reporting were developed and issued to staff.  The revision and confirmation of the Lanyon Homestead Bushfire Operations Plan and Bushfire Action Plan were also achieved during 2017–18.

Investigate infrastructure requirements to improve water supply, Wi-Fi connectivity and heritage conservation for Lanyon, and develop a comprehensive business case to put to Government.

Following the completion of infrastructure assessments for water supply, internet connectivity and mobile telephone access, a comprehensive business case was developed and was the basis for a successful application for funding in the 2018–19 ACT Budget for a package of infrastructure works at the ACT Historic Places.

 

Leadership – An integral part of the cultural life of the Canberra region and beyond

Strategies to achieve this :

>        Develop Lanyon as a heritage tourism hub and a ‘must see’ attraction for visitors wanting to experience Australia’s settlement history.

>        Use the Lanyon Heritage Centre to welcome visitors to the Lanyon site and to research and promote Lanyon’s significance.

>        Open up more spaces in Lanyon homestead for historical interpretation.

>        Present Calthorpes’ House as Australia’s best example of a domestic museum of the 1920s.

>        Present Mugga-Mugga as an authentic setting to experience life on the Limestone Plains before Canberra was established.

>        Ensure the Historic Places are used as examples of best practice in cultural heritage management, including for tertiary education.

>        Extend the portfolio of Historic Places, to include sites that allow Canberra’s more recent history to be explored.

Actions

Results

Complete an Interpretive Concept Plan for Lanyon and progress further aspects of a full master plan to guide future management, infrastructure requirements and interpretation of this important site.

The Interpretive Concept Plan for the Lanyon Homestead has been completed and implementation is underway with the goal of progressing towards a full master plan.

Increase awareness of Historic Places sites in local, regional, national and international markets, through promotion of their special features and through cultural tourism initiatives, including working with VisitCanberra to market tourism Route 5 and promote special events.

Historic Places worked to increase awareness of its historic sites in local, regional, national and international markets.  Updates to the website and imagery were made and a tagline, ‘Step into the Story’, was introduced to align markets more closely with key audiences and target markets.  Opportunities were pursued for Historic Places to work with VisitCanberra.  Collaboration involved the establishment of a Tourist Drive 5 working group, and consolidation of relationships with the Canberra Visitor Centre and ACT Parks and Conservation Service to promote Historic Places properties.

Use the Lanyon Heritage Centre as a hub for education programs and collection management activities.

The Spring Walk and Talk Series was hosted in the Lanyon Heritage Centre.  This venue also houses material from the ACT Historic Places Collection.  Archival material and equipment is stored at the Centre, where facilities are available for specialist cleaning and conservation treatment to take place.  Since March 2018, the Centre’s east wing has been used for staff meetings and education programs with a total of 46 programs being conducted there during 2017–18. The Centre is also the venue for Lanyon’s Artist-in-Residence program.

Promote venue hire opportunities at Lanyon and Mugga-Mugga, balancing this with core site functions. Develop opportunities to increase income from activities such as the Lanyon cafe and shop.

Venue hire opportunities at Lanyon were promoted in ways that balance with core site functions.  Venue hire information for Lanyon is available on the Historic Places website and includes information about catering options provided by the Barracks Espresso Bar and Eating House.  Staff at Historic Places worked to improve the booking and marketing process for weddings and other events.

 

The refit of the Lanyon café was accompanied by its rebranding to the Barracks Espresso Bar and Eating House.  The improved facilities include a new entry from the courtyard and a large terrace with outdoor seating.  Following consultation with a hospitality adviser, the café’s business model was revised to offer enhanced levels of service, opportunities to grow the number of functions and events, and increases in revenue.

 

There were 17 weddings held at Lanyon during the year and a 24 per cent increase from the previous year in the number of guests.  In addition to weddings, there was a 20 per cent increase in other celebrations held at Lanyon, including engagement and birthday parties.

 

Lanyon also attracted a range of training workshops, with 42 days of training or workshops held during 2017–18 (a substantial increase from the 11 days during 2016–17).

Maintain and develop partnerships between the Historic Places and other relevant organisations/institutions, including :

·         the National Trust;

·         the University of Canberra and the Australian National University;

·         national cultural institutions and relevant government agencies; and

·         the ACT Heritage Unit and Council.

During 2017–18, the Director of Historic Places was a guest speaker and lecturer for several events and organisations, including the National Trust AGM, the Australian National University and the ACT ICOMOS conference.  The Director and other Historic Places staff attended the Destination Canberra conference in February 2018.  Staff also attended the inaugural Historic Houses Association of Australia conference in Sydney in April 2018.

 

Work was undertaken with external agencies to achieve cultural heritage management goals, including with the ACT Parks and Conservation Service to undertake restoration works along Murrumbidgee River and the Rural Fire Service on the development of the Bushfire Operations Plan.  A specialist workshop was convened by Historic Places on the Mugga-Mugga Grasslands.  This was attended by representatives from CSIRO, the ANU and the Environment, Planning and Sustainable Development Directorate.

 

Historic Places hosted learning programs for cultural heritage management students from the ANU and University of Canberra.

 

A Cultural Landscape Plan was drafted for Mugga-Mugga and involved consultation and workshop participation with representatives from Friends of Grasslands, CSIRO, ANU Fenner School, Southern ACT Catchment Group, National Museum of Australia, the Environment, Planning and Sustainable Development Directorate and the agistment lessee.

 

Historic Places prepared a successful ACT Health grant application in partnership with University of Canberra, ACT Parks and Conservation Service, The Arboretum and Active Canberra.[JM2]   The grant will enable the development of a framework for engaging non-traditional segments in physical activity in natural environments.  A pilot project will take place with older persons 65+ at three destinations in Canberra.

Celebrate the 90th birthday of Calthorpes’ House as a means to showcase the importance of this historic place in the history of Canberra, including by special events to coincide with Floriade 2017.

The 90th birthday celebrations for Calthorpes’ House provided a program of activities and workshops on domestic themes such as cake-decorating, stamping, flower-arranging and pianola music, with links to Floriade 2017.

In conjunction with other ACT agencies, continue to explore the potential for a further house museum, including the scope for use of one or more of the Northbourne Housing units for this purpose.

In conjunction with other ACT agencies, and the Historic Places Advisory Committee, Historic Places explored the potential for a further house museum and alternative activities to deliver the organisation’s objectives with regard to Canberra’s recent history.  These options will be considered by the Board at its August 2018 meeting.

 


B.3 Scrutiny

Auditor-General Report No. 8/2017 – SELECTED ACT GOVERNMENT AGENCIES’ MANAGEMENT OF PUBLIC ART

Recommendation No. 4 summary

Action

Status

CFC should monitor its public art asset listings so that they are up‑to‑date and aligned with the
ACT Insurance Authority asset register and the Public Art Database.

CFC will provide the ACT Insurance Authority (ACTIA) with updated information about the CFC’s public art asset holdings, to ensure consistency between ACTIA’s asset register and its own asset register, as regards public art.

 

 

Complete.

Auditor-General’s INTERIM AUDIT MANAGEMENT REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2017

Recommendation No. 1 summary

Action

Status

The CFC should ensure that: (i) evidence of the satisfactory receipt of goods or services is documented on supporting payment documentation prior to payment of invoices. (ii) payments are not processed unless supporting payment documentation has clear evidence of the satisfactory receipt of goods or services; and (iii) financial delegates do not certify the satisfactory receipt of goods and services and approve invoices for payment.

CFC will alter its procedure requiring invoices be approved for payment by a financial delegate to also include evidence of the receipt of goods and services before an invoice will be accepted for processing and payment. The acknowledgement of the satisfactory receipt of goods or services should be performed by someone other than the financial delegate, ideally from the same business unit. Where the financial delegate has acknowledged the satisfactory receipt of goods or services, financial delegation will be required by another officer with financial delegation, including those with whole of CFC authority in Corporate Finance.

 

 

A new process for documenting the satisfactory receipt of goods or services on invoices was implemented in December 2017. All invoices examined after the implementation of this process contained sufficient evidence that the goods or services had been received.

CFC assessed the risk of erroneous, irregular or fraudulent payments for invoices paid between July 2017 to December 2017 without evidence of satisfactory receipt of goods or services on invoices.  No such payments were detected.

Auditor-General Report No. 2/2018 – ACT GOVERNMENT STRATEGIC AND ACCOUNTABILITY INDICATORS

Recommendation No. 2 summary

Action

Status

CFC’s strategic indicators should be improved so they meet the Quantifiable measurement criterion. If the strategic indicators cannot meet the criterion of Quantifiable through supporting quantitative data, CFC should use qualitative data that can be assessed and explained through commentary.

 

 

Once CMTEDD update the Performance and Accountability Framework, CFC will use the revised criteria as the basis for assessing the suitability of its Strategic and Accountability indicators.

In progress.  Awaiting outcome of CMTEDD’s review and update of the Performance and Accountability Framework.

Auditor-General Report No. 4/2018 – 2016-17 FINANCIAL AUDITS COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS

Recommendation No. 5 summary

Action

Status

CFC should: (i) remove all generic (shared) user accounts and assign all users with a unique user name and password; (ii) require passwords for generic user accounts to be changed every 90 days; and (iii) implement alternate secure network logon methods that facilitate fast access to systems.

(i) and (ii) CFC will assign unique network user names and passwords to existing staff accessing the generic account.  In the transition period until these unique identifiers are implemented, it will turn off access to Outlook and the internet to users of the generic account; and (iii) CFC will explore the use of biometric readers to further enhance security.

(i) In progress.  CFC continues to assign unique network user names and passwords to existing staff accessing the generic account.  CFC has turned off access to Outlook and the internet to users of the generic account.  The generic account can no longer access Outlook and the Internet.

(ii) No longer required due to the action in (i) above.

(iii) CFC continues to explore the use of biometric readers to further enhance security.

There were no Legislative Assembly Committee reports that related specifically to the CFC in 2017–18.

For further information contact : CFO, CFC Corporation Finance (02) 6205 2195


B.4 Risk Management

The CFC has a comprehensive Strategic Risk Management Plan (SRMP) which is implemented and monitored on an ongoing basis.  This document provides the framework for supporting strategies and plans relating to more specific areas of risk, such as disaster preparedness and business continuity plans. 

The CFC’s SRMP was reviewed by the CFC’s Audit Committee at its 24 May 2018 meeting.  The revised and updated document was endorsed by the CFC Board at its 21 June 2018 meeting.

The Chief Executive Officer Financial Instruction (CEFI) on the SRMP was revised to reflect the updated SRMP. 


B.5 Internal Audit

The CFC Audit Committee met on six occasions during 2017–18.  Meetings were held on 13 July 2017, 21 September 2017, 4 December 2017, 5 February 2018, 28 March 2018 and 24 May 2018.  The number of meetings attended by Committee members was as follows :

Name of Member

Position

Meetings attended

Eugene Kalenjuk

Chair

Six

Harriet Elvin

Member

Six

Louise Douglas

Member

Four

Raoul Craemer (resigned 10 April 2018)

Member

Two

The CFO is invited to each meeting as an observer and an invitation is also extended to the ACT Audit Office to send an observer to each meeting.

The Audit Committee Charter is provided as part of the Governance Charter available at http://www.culturalfacilities.act.gov.au and incorporates specific roles for risk management and audit matters.

The Audit Committee Charter was reviewed by the Board at its 19 April 2018 meeting, to enable non-Board members with financial management expertise to be appointed to the Committee.  Eugene Kalenjuk’s CFC Board appointment concluded on the 5 March 2018 and the amendment enabled him to continue chairing the CFC Audit Committee as an External Member.

Internal Audit

The Audit Committee reviews and approves an internal audit/quality assurance plan for each financial year.  A CEFI has been issued dealing with audit committee and internal audit matters.

During the year, an internal quality assurance program was developed and implemented, focusing on areas of key risk as identified from items identified in the SRMP, Fraud Control Plan, external audits and the work of the Audit Committee. 


B.6 Fraud Prevention

The CFC has a comprehensive Fraud Control Plan (FCP) which is implemented and monitored on an ongoing basis.  Oversight of this plan is undertaken by the Audit Committee, as one of the roles under its Charter – refer to http://www.culturalfacilities.act.gov.au.

A review and update of the CFC’s FCP was completed by the Audit Committee at its meeting on 24 May 2018.  The revised and updated document was endorsed by the CFC Board at its meeting on 21 June 2018.

The CFC conducted Fraud and Corruption Awareness training for staff in June 2018 and covered the following topics  :

>        the CFC’s Fraud and Corruption Prevention Framework and FCP, which provide the basis for fraud prevention strategies and fraud detection within the CFC;

>        relevant CEFIs, such as those dealing with credit card usage;

>        the Public Interest Disclosure Act 2012; and

>        Internal Audit and Quality Assurance programs.

The CEO’s “start the year” email for 2018 reminded staff of their responsibilities with regard to fraud control and prevention.


B.7 Work Health and Safety

The CFC is committed to maintaining the health, safety and welfare of its employees.  Workplace Health and Safety (WHS) is managed in accordance with the statutory provisions of the Work Health and Safety Act 2011.

The CFC has :

>        adopted a CFC WHS Policy Statement, which has been advised to all staff;

>        nominated 10 Health and Safety Representatives;

>        established a WHS Committee and a Health and Safety Representatives Committee; and

>        ensured that WHS issues are discussed at each fortnightly meeting of the CFC senior management committee – refer to B.1.7.

The CFC’s WHS arrangements operate as part of the ACT WHS and Injury Management Improvement Strategy, which commits ACT Government employers and employees to high standards of workplace health and safety.  The CFC’s WHS arrangements also acknowledge the targets set by the ACT Government for improving WHS performance, injury management and prevention.

The CFC Board receives a WHS report at each meeting.  These reports include information about : accidents or incidents; outcomes and corrective action from previous accidents or incidents; risk assessments undertaken; meetings of the WHS Committee and Health and Safety Representatives Committee, together with key issues discussed at these meetings; training provided on WHS;  progress on development of the Safety Management System; and other WHS matters, such as security management.  

In addition, every six months, a further report is provided to the Board on key WHS risks in the CFC, together with risk controls and risk treatment strategies. 

Work Health and Safety Act 2011

One Improvement Notice was issued to the CFC during 2017-18, relating to the need to inspect access areas to the Canberra Theatre Centre roof.  The matter has since been rectified and the Notice lifted.

One Prohibition Notice was issued to the CFC during 2017-18, prohibiting work on the Canberra Theatre Centre roof requiring use of the existing roof anchor points/access lines.  This matter is being addressed by installing new anchor points/access lines under 2018-19 ACT Budget funding.

In 2017-18, the CFC did not receive other notices of improvement, prohibition, or non-disturbance under Part 10 of the Work Health and Safety Act 2011.

In 2017-18, the CFC received no notices of enforceable undertakings under Part 11 of the Work Health and Safety Act 2011.

In 2017-18, the CFC received no notices of failure to comply with a safety duty under Part 2, Division 2.2, 2.3 or 2.4 of the Work Health and Safety Act 2011.

In 2017-18, CFC staff members were trained in WHS through participation in a number of courses, including :

>        Health and Safety Representative training;

>        Respect, Equity and Diversity training;

>        ACTIA Risk Management training

>        Working at Heights training;

>        Incident response training;

>        Manual Handling;

>        Security Awareness;

>        Chainsaw training;

>        Entertainment Assist Mental Health training;

>        Emergency Control Organisation training; and

>        First Aid training.

There were no serious injury, illness or dangerous incidents reported to WorkSafe ACT in accordance with Part 3 Section 38 of the Work Health and Safety Act 2011 in 2017-18.


B.8 Human Resources Management

B.8. 1 Human Resources Management

The CFC’s approach to Human Resources (HR) management and workforce planning is through the ongoing implementation and review of its HR Plan.  Further information about HR management is provided in Section B.2.1.

B.8.2 Learning and Development

The CFC places high importance on staff training and development.  During 2017-18, staff attended many formal training courses, a range of conferences and seminars, and other professional development opportunities.  These ranged from training courses on specific topics, such as Respect, Equity and Diversity; Fringe Benefits Tax; Project Management and Reporting System training; new Freedom of Information Act 2016 training; and Government Budget Management System training; through to attendances at meetings and conferences for the arts and museum sector, such as annual conferences of the Australian Performing Arts Centres Association and the Association of Asian Pacific Performing Arts Centres 2017.

Other examples of professional development opportunities attended by staff include the 2018 Australian Institute of Company Directors Governance Summit; 2017 Australia —Singapore Cultural Leaders’ Forum; Global Cultural Districts Network (Dubai); inaugural Perfecting the Art Theatre Management Forum; inaugural Historic Houses Association conference; and Arts Up Front conference.  The CFC also undertakes performance management/skills development assessment programs.  Further information is provided under Section B.2.1.

Expenditure on staff training and professional development during 2017-18 amounted to $78,530.  This amount includes membership fees for professional development programs, staff training and conference fees. Associated travel and accommodation costs are not included in this amount.

During the year, 59 staff participated in the ACTPS study assistance program or in courses provided by ACTPS training panel providers, at a total cost of $11,120.

B.8.3 Attraction and Retention Initiatives (ARins)

Description

No. Of Individual ARins

No. of Group ARins

Total employees covered by Group ARins

Total

Number of ARins as at 30 June 2018

10

-

-

10

Number of ARins entered into during the period

-

-

-

-

Number of ARins terminated during the period

-

-

-

-

Number of ARins providing for privately plated vehicles as at 30 June 2018

-

-

-

-

Number of ARins for employees who have transferred from SEAs during the period

-

-

-

-

 

 

 

Classification Range

Remuneration as at 30 June 2018

Individual and Group ARins

CTC Technician Level 4 – SOGA

$63,437 - $137,415

The CFC convenes meetings of its Agency Consultative Committee (ACC) consisting of staff, management and union representatives, when needed.  The ACC did not meet in 2017–18.

B.8.4 Staffing Profile

The CFC’s Staffing Profile as at 25 June 2018 (the last pay date for the 2017-18 financial year) was as follows.

FTE and headcount by division/branch

Division/branch

FTE

Headcount

Cultural Facilities Corporation

103

157

FTE and headcount by gender

 

Female

Male

Total

Full Time Equivalent

53

50

103

Headcount

90

67

157

Percentage of workforce

57%

43%

100%

Headcount by classification and gender

Classification groups

Female

Male

Total

Apprentice

-

1

1

ASO2

19

4

23

ASO3

5

1

6

ASO4

8

4

12

ASO5     

8

4

12

ASO6

4

4

8

GSO2

1

1

2

GSO5

-

1

1

GSO7

-

2

2

GSO9

-

1

1

PO1

5

1

6

PO2

2

-

2

SOGA

-

1

1

SOGB

1

2

3

SOGC

4

1

5

SPOC

-

1

1

Executive Contract

1

-

1

Box Office

5

3

8

Patron Services

20

16

36

Stage Door

1

1

2

Tech. Level 1

5

14

19

Tech. Level 2

1

1

2

Tech. Level 4

-

3

3

Total

90

67

157

Headcount by employment category and gender

 

Female

                Male

Total

Casual

53

40

93

Permanent Full-time

18

18

36

Permanent Part-time

11

1

12

Temporary Full-time

5

7

12

Temporary Part-time

3

1

4

Total

90

67

157

Headcount by diversity group

Division/branch

Headcount

Percentage of agency workforce

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples

1

1%

Culturally and Linguistically diverse

6

4%

People with Disability

3

2%

Prospective employees of the CFC are asked to identify their ethnicity or disability.  However, declaring this information is not mandatory. 

Headcount by age group, gender and average length of service

Age Group

Female

Average length of service

                Male

Average length of service

Under 25

16

1

14

3

25-34

20

3

13

2

35-44

13

5

13

4

45-54

23

8

11

8

55 and over

18

8

16

10

Recruitment and separation rates by classification group

Classification

Recruitment rate

Classification

Separation rate

GSO2

-

GSO2

3%

Tech 2

2%

Tech 2

2%

Tech 4

2%

Tech 4

2%

ASO3

2%

ASO3

-

ASO4

2%

ASO4

2%

ASO5

3%

ASO5

2%

ASO6

-

ASO6

2%

PO1

2%

PO2

2%

PO2

-

PO2

3%

SOG C

-

SOG C

2%

The statistics exclude Board members and people on leave without pay.


B.9 Ecologically Sustainable Development

Climate Change and Greenhouse Gas Reduction policies and programs

>        The CFC is implementing a Resource Management Plan to ensure it manages its energy use as efficiently as possible.  One aspect of this in 2017-18 was to replace CMAG’s existing lighting with new LED lighting that meets contemporary current energy efficiency, conservation and display standards.

>        The Canberra Theatre Centre contributed to Earth Hour on 24 March 2018 by turning off all its exterior lights not required for security and public safety.  The LED screen located at the front of the Centre was also powered down.

Sustainable development performance 2017-18 and 2016-17

Indicator as at 30 June

Unit

2017-18

2016-17

Percentage
change

Public sector body staff and area

 

 

 

 

Public sector staff during the period

FTE

103

88

17%

Workplace floor area

Area (m2)

16,289

16,289

-

Stationary energy usage

 

 

 

 

Electricity use

Kilowatt hours

2,030,498

2,068,404

(2%)

Natural gas use

Megajoules

5,979,6811

7,310,015

(18%)

Diesel

Kilolitres

-

-

-

Transport fuel usage

 

 

 

 

Electric vehicles

Number

-

-

-

Hybrid vehicles

Number

-

-

-

Other vehicles (that are not electric or hybrid)

Number

5

5

-

Total number of vehicles

Number

5

5

-

Total kilometres travelled

Kilometres

49,133

54,815

(10%)

Fuel use – Petrol

Kilolitres

2.2

2.9

(24%)

Fuel use – Diesel

Kilolitres

2.3

1.5

53%

Fuel use – Liquid Petroleum Gas (LPG)

Kilolitres

-

-

-

Fuel use – Compressed Natural Gas (CNG)

Gigajoules

-

-

-

Water usage

 

 

 

 

Water use

Kilolitres

7,8022

5,941

31%

Resource efficiency and waste

 

 

 

Reams of paper purchased

Reams

747

734

2%

Recycled content of paper purchased

Percentage

49%

49%

-

Waste to landfill

Litres3

197,420

186,680

6%

 

Tonnes3

36.94

25.2

46%

Co-mingled material recycled

Litres3

51,480

51,480

-

 

Tonnes3

21.95

51.2

(57%)

Paper & Cardboard recycled (incl. secure paper)

Litres

23,346

22,880

2%

 

Tonnes

1.4

1.8

(22%)

Organic material recycled

Litres

Note6

Note6

 

Greenhouse gas emissions

 

 

 

 

Emissions from stationary energy use

Tonnes CO2-e

1,2327

1,606

(23%)

Emissions from transport

Tonnes CO2-e

11

11

-

Total emissions

Tonnes CO2-e

1,244

1,617

(23%)

The information used for calculations in the above table was provided by ActewAGL, ICON Water, ACT Property Group, OfficeMax Australia Ltd, Toms Trash Paks, Suez, Recall/Iron Mountain, Cleanaway and SG Fleet Australia Pty Ltd., with assistance from : the Environment, Planning and Sustainable Development Directorate; Climate Change and Sustainability—Carbon Neutral Government Program; and the Enterprise Sustainability Platform.

1.       Natural gas consumption decreased due to installation of a more energy efficient HVAC system in North Building.

2.       The increase in water use is related to the accurate reading of water meters at the Canberra Theatre Centre in 2017–18.  Meter readings were not taken in 2016‑17, ICON instead using estimated water usage.

3.       Not all service providers of waste collection from CFC facilities report the amounts of waste collected in litres.  Some provide the amounts in tonnes.  It is not possible to convert tonnes to litres, therefore both figures are provided. 

4.       The increase in Waste to Landfill tonnage is related to additional waste pick-ups at the Canberra Theatre Centre due to increased activities in the venues.

5.       The decrease in Co-mingled material recycling is due to a larger than usual volume of waste disposal in 2016–17, resulting from the following.

·         CMAG was closed temporarily in 2016-17 due to an upgrade HVAC system and administrative areas of North Building were also moved temporarily to another location.  In preparation for the move, staff required an extra service to dispose of accumulated waste, which increased waste disposal in 2016-17.

·         The Canberra Theatre had all its seats replaced in 2016-17.  Steel from the old seats was recycled and the remainder of the old seats went to waste.

 

6.       Large amounts of garden waste are collected, composted and re-used to replenish the gardens at the ACT Historic Places.  However, it is not possible to quantify the amount of organic material recycled.

7.       The decrease is due to a change in the calculation used – please see below.


The following statements have been provided by the Environment, Planning and Sustainable Development Directorate; Climate Change and Sustainability—Carbon Neutral Government Program for inclusion in this report.

Greenhouse gas emissions factors

 

Emissions reported for stationary energy and transport fuels include Scope 1 and Scope 2 emissions only.

 

Emission factors used to calculate natural gas and fleet fuel are based on the latest National Greenhouse Accounts (NGA) Factors.

 

Greenhouse gas emissions for electricity consumption have been calculated using the following emissions factors based on the latest (May 2018) ACT Electricity Emissions Factor Report :

 

>          A factor of 0.549 kilogram (kg) CO2-e / kilowatt hour (kWh) or 0.549 tonne (t) CO2-e / megawatt hour (MWh) has been used to calculate electricity emissions (Scope 2) for the 2016–17 period.

>          A factor of 0.455 kilogram (kg) CO2-e / kilowatt hour (kWh) or 0.455 tonne (t) CO2-e / megawatt hour (MWh) has been used to calculate electricity emissions (Scope 2) for the 2017–18 period.

 

The emissions factors include total GreenPower purchases for the ACT calculated in the third quarter of the respective financial years and are specific to the ACT.  These emissions factors (Scope 2) reflect the increasing contribution of renewable electricity generated under the ACT’s 100 per cent Renewable Energy Target (RET).  Consequently they are lower than those reported in the latest National Greenhouse Accounts (NGA) Factors.

 

Green Power purchased for 2017-18

The ACT Government purchased an estimated 7,600 MWh (Megawatt hours) of GreenPower, representing an indicative 5% of electricity consumption for 2017–18.